dry cleaner's /vs./ dry cleaners

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
dry cleaner's = a shop where you can take clothes etc to be dry-cleaned

Hi,
I have an American English learning book in which the red apostrophe is omitted. I mean it's written like => dry cleaners

Isn't it wrong with out the red apostrophe?

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Dry cleaner's = pronomial phrase meaning "the dry cleaner's shop"
    Dry cleaners -> the plural of "dry cleaner". "Dry cleaner" is a noun phrase describing an occupation.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Don't you agree with this dictionary that "dry cleaner's" and "dry cleaners" are the same thing?
    I don't think that I do. The possessive apostrophe is there for a reason.

    Compare
    Shall I come to your house or will you come to mine? (Mine is a possessive = my house)
    Shall I come to you or will you come to me? -> this does not say where anyone will come.

    In this case, the possessive tells us where we will go, whereas the objective does not.

    I took my suit to the dry cleaners -> I took my suit to the people whose occupation is "dry cleaner".
    I took my suit to the dry cleaner's -> I took my suit to the dry cleaner's shop.

    The meaning of both is almost the same but, in certain contexts there can be a distinction - particularly in the singular:

    I took my dog to the vet. -> It was a Sunday and so I had to take the dog to the vet's house.
    I took my dog to the vet's. -> I took my dog to the vet's surgery/office.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    Then, the dictionary is not correct. Yes Paul most of the dictionaries agree with what you have said. I just wondered when I saw the Wordweb dictionary had written it.

    Thank you.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    ss.jpg


    Source: Top Notch Fundamentals by Joan Saslow (American English learning book)

    So, the above picture is wrong. Am I right?

    a dry cleaner's :tick:
    a dry cleaner :tick:
    dry cleaners :tick:
    a dry cleaners :cross: => doesn't make sense with an apostrophe.

    AM I right?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The term 'dry cleaners' is used in BE to mean a business that does dry cleaning. I think that it is more common than 'dry cleaner's', but that would be hard to prove. A Google search certainly indicates that many of the businesses refer to themselves as 'dry cleaners'. When I take a suit to the dry cleaners I don't go to find some dry cleaners, I go to a shop that does dry cleaning.

    There seems nothing wrong with your dictionary.

    I have a strong feeling that this has been discussed previously.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    The term 'dry cleaners' is used in BE to mean a business that does dry cleaning. I think that it is more common than 'dry cleaner's', but that would be hard to prove. A Google search certainly indicates that many of the businesses refer to themselves as 'dry cleaners'. When I take a suit to the dry cleaners I don't go to find some dry cleaners, I go to a shop that does dry cleaning.

    There seems nothing wrong with your dictionary.

    I have a strong feeling that this has been discussed previously.
    Don't you think that in the picture I uploaded in post #6 the author should have used an apostrophe between "r" and "s"? Or just typed "a dry cleaner"?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You can either consider the picture to be of a person (a dry cleaner) or of a business/shop (a dry cleaners).

    In the context of the book, it is clearly intended to be the latter.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's a shop staffed by dry cleaners. Which we shorten by calling it "a (shop of) dry cleaners".
     
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