dry heaves

Pilarcita

Senior Member
Spanish, Mexico
Hi, could anyone tells me what the dry heaves means .
I found it in two different parts of a dialogue; I thought I understood it the first time, but…
Well, there is a woman talking to her friend about how her husband is leaving her because “it gives him the dry heaves to imagine himself going through the joyless choreography of sex with me anymore”
Does it mean that he felt nauseated?
Then, she says that sex with her husband “was better than great, it gave him the dry heaves.

I´m completely lost wit this one.
Somebody could give me a hand?
Thanks
 
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  • Oeco

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Dry heaves means that you want to throw up but nothing comes out. Horrible feeling. I have no idea what the "great heaves" are.
     

    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    Thanks a lot, Oeco, for your quick answer. Sorry, it was also dry heaves in the second quote, what puzzles me is that in both situations the guy gets the dry heaves. Could the second one be a metaphor for an incredible orgasm?
     

    Oeco

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm lost on this one. Wish I could help. Not sure why "dry heaves" would be thought of as the result of great sex. I'm working on it in my vast library of sexual metaphors. But that will take some time. It's vast.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've only heard "dry heaves" used in the negative sense that Oeco mentions. If you are now saying that "dry heaves" was used in both contexts, then I would think that "dry heaves" in the second instance might (maybe?) refer to a failure to ejaculate on his part (assuming the context is negative).
     

    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    Thanks Oeco, I can wait.
    Joelline, I don't think that the context is negative or even sarcastic, I think that both situations are abismal, the first one negatively, the second positively. But better wait for Oeco findings.
    Thank you for being so helpful
    ¡Salud!
     

    una madre

    Senior Member
    Western Canada English
    Dry heaves means that you want to throw up but nothing comes out. Horrible feeling. I have no idea what the "great heaves" are.
    Agree with Oeco.
    dry heaves = retching (nothing comes out)

    Have never heard of "great heaves." Are you sure of your original posting of the dialogue?
     

    Oeco

    Senior Member
    English - US
    No results my sexual metaphor database says. It offers "dry fuck" as a search alternative. But that doesn't fit in context either.
     

    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    No, Oeco, it doesn't fit. Anyway, thanks a lot Oeco, I think that being dry heaves an unpleasant feeling it drives you nuts, in the first case, literally. And in the second in a positive way: it takes your breath away, but in a very satisfactory way.
    Again thank you all.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    ("Great heaves" has been corrected in the OP.)

    We all agree on the first part of the dialogue. The husband finds the mere idea of sex with her so repulsive that it makes him retch.

    Does the second phrase follow directly on the first or does it come later?
     

    una madre

    Senior Member
    Western Canada English
    Who knows?
    Are you meaning that they had sex after they broke up?
    I'm thinking that this is a sarcastic play on words.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Can you give some more context for the puzzling second quote, Pilarcita?

    Perhaps the full sentence and a couple of sentences before and the one after?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Maybe, as her husband's leaving her and she may feel a little bit bitter about that, she means: Sex was better than great: not only did I thoroughly enjoy it but it gave that bastard the dry heaves ~ result!
     

    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    Hi, una madre: as you’ll read, they didn’t have sex after the rupture. Ewie, I think you got it.
    Here is the whole context:




    CAROL: What reason did he give?
    PHYLLIS: He doesn’t love me—he doesn’t like to be around me—it gives him the dry heaves to imagine himself going through the joyless choreography of sex with me anymore.


    ======== [moderator note: edited to conform to the 4-line maximum when quoting from copyrighted works] ========

    CAROL: OK—so the sex was great.

    PHYLLIS: Great? It was better than great—it gave him the dry heaves.
     
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    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    "I'm thinking that this is a sarcastic play on words." Yes, una madre. I also think so. I 've found a couple of them, which is very characteristic of Woody Allen.

     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry, Pilarcita: even with the context, I still don't know what it means.

    The humour seems to centre around the contrast between the speaker's profession of analyst (I assume psycho-analyst) and the fact that she and her husband didn't communicate at all. So maybe the joke is that, at the time, she misinterpreted the dry heaves too.
     

    Pilarcita

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    Don't worry Loob. And yes, she is a psycho-analyst. It could be as you said.
    Thanks a lot for your help, I really appreciate it.
     
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