dry off, up, out, away ?

beam1004x

Member
korean
It was pouring heavily yesterday. and I stopped by his house
to dry ( ) my jacket.

Question's here. Can I use "off, up, out, away" in that blank?
If so, what's the difference?
I think "off, up, out" can be used and the meaning is quite similar. but away is a little awkward. get me right, please.
 
  • moo_88

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,

    If it was me I would say either:

    - It was pouring heavily yesterday and I stopped by his house to dry my jacket.
    - It was pouring heavily yesterday and I stopped by his house to dry off my jacket.
    - It was pouring heavily yesterday and I stopped by his house to dry out my jacket.

    These all have virtually the same meaning but which one you use could vary depending on what you used to dry it.

    The phrase "dry up" has a different meaning.
    e.g. The river had dried up because there had been no rain for several months.
    She used a towel to dry up the dinner plates after she had washed them.

    Hope this helps.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    <<...>>

    A jacket can be "dried" or "dried out." It could only be "dried off" if it had a water-repellant coating so that the water was only on the surface, not absorbed by the fabric.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top