dubious, despite the fact the ....

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fadefade

Senior Member
Italian
I'm looking at some exercises about the use of English in Cambridge tests.
I've come across to this sentence :
"Even though the company offered him a high salary, David was still dubious about accepting the job".
The task is to rewrite the sentence so that it has a similar meaning ( with the word given and you have to use between 3 and 6 words. )
DESPITE ( word given )
David was still dubious about accepting the job,....................him a higher salary.

I have rewritten :
David was still dubious about accepting the job, despite the fact the company offered him a higher salary

But the correct answer is :
..despite the company 's offering

Why mine cannot be accepted?

Thank you
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If one wants to write something similar to your answer, it would have to be "... despite the fact that the company ..."

    The preference for avoiding the phrase "the fact that" is a matter of style, but writers on English style generally agree that it should be avoided. It adds length, but no information. English style is usually, all other things being equal, to use the shorter of two alternatives. This is especially true in business and professional environments.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    If one wants to write something similar to your answer, it would have to be "... despite the fact that the company ..."

    The preference for avoiding the phrase "the fact that" is a matter of style, but writers on English style generally agree that it should be avoided. It adds length, but no information. English style is usually, all other things being equal, to use the shorter of two alternatives. This is especially true in business and professional environments.
    OOPS! I missed this. Egmont is right.
     
    What about "despite the company offering him" (no possessive)? Informal?
    Thanks.
    While some would accept that form, old-fashioned proscriptive grammar would call that wrong. You use the possessive form with gerunds. Consider this:
    A student arrives late for class. The teacher is displeased, because she wants the students to be in class on time. Here are two possible statements by the teacher:
    I do not like your arriving late for class.
    I do not like you arriving late for class.

    What is the teacher trying to say to the student: that the teacher does not like the student himself, or that the teacher does not like the late arrival? Clearly, the teacher is not saying that she does not like the student, but that she does not like the late arrival. However, the structure of the second version makes "you" into the object of the verb, and the literal meaning of the sentence is that the teacher does not like the student! The first version makes it clear that what the teacher dislikes is not the student, but the arriving late, with "your" showing whose late arrival it is that the teacher means.

    In the sentence that fadefade gave us, David was not dubious despite the company itself, but was instead dubious despite the company's action of offering a higher salary. In order to keep "offering" rather than "company" as the object of the preposition "despite", we need to have "company's" in the possessive form.
     

    fadefade

    Senior Member
    Italian
    While some would accept that form, old-fashioned proscriptive grammar would call that wrong. You use the possessive form with gerunds. Consider this:
    A student arrives late for class. The teacher is displeased, because she wants the students to be in class on time. Here are two possible statements by the teacher:
    I do not like your arriving late for class.
    I do not like you arriving late for class.

    What is the teacher trying to say to the student: that the teacher does not like the student himself, or that the teacher does not like the late arrival? Clearly, the teacher is not saying that she does not like the student, but that she does not like the late arrival. However, the structure of the second version makes "you" into the object of the verb, and the literal meaning of the sentence is that the teacher does not like the student! The first version makes it clear that what the teacher dislikes is not the student, but the arriving late, with "your" showing whose late arrival it is that the teacher means.

    In the sentence that fadefade gave us, David was not dubious despite the company itself, but was instead dubious despite the company's action of offering a higher salary. In order to keep "offering" rather than "company" as the object of the preposition "despite", we need to have "company's" in the possessive form.
    Very clear explanation!
    Thanks. .I think it is difficult for me to see these indications when I'm doing exercises. .but I'll try my best!
    Thanks again very much!
     
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