dudaklarında kaybolsam

ireney

Modistra
Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
Urgh!!!!

I don't know guys, I have to convince one of you to join me in my misery or something!

Now someone wants the folllowing translated to Greek:

işte sen;aldığı nefesleri sayan değil,nefesini kesen anları sayan birisin,benim için hayatsın meleğim!

I have the following as a translation of it in English:
you are a life my angel,who does not count the number of beneath, in case, you counts the moments that cut the beneath.


Well, as you can see the English translation doesn't make much sense as English although I don't doubt it's a verbatim though wooden translation. Can someone please help me understand what it means? If I translate the English text I'm going to come up with Greek gibbersih!
 
  • Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    İşte sen; aldığı nefesleri sayan değil, nefesini kesen anları sayan birisin, benim için hayatsın meleğim!
    It's you who does not count the breath you take but the one who counts the moments that take your breath away, you're the life for me, my angel!

    Oh, dear. Oh, dear. Ireney, I must say it may lose its meaing in translation because it's too complicated and metaphoric.

    Hope I could help.

    P.S: Why "dudaklarında kaybolsam" is the title, by the way? :)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    OH Chazz! I can't understand much of the translation you made but it does sound beautiful!

    So, let's give names to help me understand? Please?

    X doesn't counts (as in 1,2,3,) the breaths X takes, but X counts the moments that take X's breath away? (the rest I understand and it's very nice and romantic!)

    I must say your translation has nothing to do with the one given (and validated by a Turk no less!) to me and is much, much better! You will drive your poor neighbour crazy!!! :D

    The title was the title of the piece. It was translated as "you" and I am sure it doesn't take THAT long in Turkish to say "you" :D

    P.S. There's no more context I'm afraid :( It's from a site when people translate pieces for free and someone asked for this to be translated in Greek. I asked for an English translation and this is what I got )see post #1) :(
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    "İşte sen;"
    İşte is like Behold!, Aha!, Lo! etc. Sen, of course means you, so I might well translate it as "Lo thou;" of course it does not sound that natural, I've just wanted to give you the idea. :)

    aldığı nefesleri sayan değil, nefesini kesen anları sayan birisin
    "To count,"(saymak) here I'd say is like "to care," or "to consider," you know. X does not care for all the breath he takes. In the other words, X does not care for all the moments he/she lives. X only, however, counts breathtaking moments, he cares about the exciting parts of his/her life.

    benim için hayatsın meleğim!
    "Meleğim!"="My angel!" this part makes the whole sentence more romantic. I can also translate it as "You're my life, my angel!," "You're the life to me, my angel!" an so on.

    dudaklarında kaybolsam
    It means "Let me get lost in your lips" or "What if I get lost in your lips" X basically wants to kiss his/her lips so hot that he/she may even can get lost in it.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Aha! So we have to do with someone who is VERY much inlove!

    Now it's a Turkish girl/woman who has posted it (if that matters)

    If I translate it as:

    Oh (with some kind of sigh sound close to "aman" ? a sigh of a lover?) you!

    You are the one (male) who doesn't count (as in care) how many breaths you draw (like in inhale)

    but you count the moments that take your breath away, etc am I translating it well?

    P.S thanks for the translating of the title too!

    You are a life saver Chazz! :)
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Second count is also as in care and "İşte!" is like "Behold!," "There!" where the writer points who he is with kind of proud in it, I mean sigh is not involved at all. So, aman is too far from işte. Wish I could think of any other equivalents. :)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    I think I must blow some kisses on the east wind!! You are an absolute sweetheart!

    So "Here!" "Come" "Look"?

    I think I got the rest (after pestering you again and again that is!)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Excellent! You know, the poor girl has asked thi question some ages ago and I just couldn't understand a thing!.

    So, post aside, is "İşte sen" used in general or is it "poetic"? I mean would you use it colloquially? I like the sound of it you see :)
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    İşte+pronoun(ben, sen, o, biz, siz, onlar) pattern is perfectly colloquial and we use this when we really need to indicate the pronoun in a sentence.

    It's only poetic when you give a break after "işte sen" and go on your sentence after a bit while, like this line. You see, there's a semicolon and that makes us stop for a bit while we're reading the line. Of course, without stopping there, that'd lack of excitement because after reading "işte sen" part, we wait for a while because there's a punctutation mark and it makes you wonder and go like "Yeah, yeah, he's what???" :)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Hahahaha! Great analysis and funny too! Thanks again Chazz :) Last question I swear! We can use it for "here's me" then?
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hehehe, not a problem at all. :)

    Yes, exactly. I'd translate işte ben (ben: I) as here's me or something similar. In fact, I've just checked my English-Turkish dictionary and for here is, it suggests işte as the only Turkish equivalent.

    İşte is followed by ben, sen, biz... (I, you, we...) but in English, here is is followed by me, you, us... (bana, sana, bize...) Right? So it's a little bit different in this case.
     
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