Dude

< Previous | Next >

Storditaaa

Member
Italy Italian
Hi everybody!
I was just wondering if someone could help me with this..
My problems come from "The O.C." : I'm watching the american third season..and they always say something like "Dude man..come on!" and things like that..I don't get what they mean with "dude".
Sometimes they also say (not sure about it) "Duh". Is this the same thing?
I'd be very grateful if someone could explain it to me 'cause it's driving me mad!
Thank you so much
Cheers
Elisa
 
  • river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    dude = a guy. The maildude delivers the mail. The milkdude delivers the milk, and so on.
    Duh = that's obvious, stupid.
     
    Use "Duh..." when you want to emphasize something that is obvious:

    John: "Putting your hand in boiling water really hurts!"

    Mary: "Well...Duh!" (And when you say "Duh!", you usually prolong it: Well...Duuuuhhh!)
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    There is an entire thread on duh: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=89895&highlight=duh
    Check it out, dude.

    There's even one in Italian, if you'd prefer:
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=96179&highlight=duh


    *********************************************NEW QUESTION********************************************************


    I'm exhuming this thread because I'm a bit confused about "dude".
    The open post is clearly posted by a girl (Elisa) but Kelly adressed her as dude.

    The point is: I was really sure that only men could be addressed as dude, but now I'm not that sure, even because (see post #2) dude is defined as a synonymous of chap, pal or male and those words, as far as I know, are used for both genders.

    Can you, please, help me?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Dude has traditionally (well, as traditional as slang can be) referred to a male, but it is sometimes used generally to mean "buddy" or "pal," both of which are gender-neutral. I don't use it that way, but I definitely hear it used this way. It's mostly by people much younger than I am - say mid-20s or less.

    Not to divert the thread, but you'll find that guys - which also has traditionally referred to males - is also used as a gender-neutral plural quite often. This is even more common than the gender-neutral dude, or so it seems to me.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Check it out, dude!" is a typical utterance of the type of person who uses "dude" a lot. I don't think it was specifically addressed to Storditaaa (elisa).
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Note that in British usage, dude = "a name given in ridicule to a man who is ultra-fastidious in dress, speech, deportment and 'form'..." (Shorter OED). It has a feminine dudine.

    I think, in the circumstances, foreign speakers would be wise to avoid the word entirely. In America you'll appear childish, in Britain impolite.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Giginho! Duuuuuuuude!
    ~ high five ~

    It's scary when things I said so many years ago come back to haunt me, and scarier yet when I'd still say them....
    Dude. I have teenagers in the house. I say all sorts of things I'm really too old to say. And yes, I call the female one dude on occasion.
    Then she mocks me.
    Now who's childish? Duh.

    I would never ever ever say dudine. That is truly, like, appalling.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'd also recommend against using dude in the British Isles: it's still too (erm ...) uncompromisingly American to the vast majority of ears. I've never heard a Britishperson address another* as dude without sounding like a total plonker.

    *Yes, some do do it ~ they're generally aged about 14 with IQs to match:)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Note that in British usage, dude = "a name given in ridicule to a man who is ultra-fastidious in dress, speech, deportment and 'form'..." (Shorter OED). It has a feminine dudine.

    I think, in the circumstances, foreign speakers would be wise to avoid the word entirely. In America you'll appear childish, in Britain impolite.
    I more often hear the cutesy "dudette" than "dudine".

    OK dudes and dudettes, let's get started.

     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As nobody has yet given the origins of "Dude":
    dude (n.)
    1883, "fastidious man," New York City slang of unknown origin. The vogue word of 1883, originally used in reference to the devotees of the "aesthetic" craze, later applied to city slickers, especially Easterners vacationing in the West (e.g. dude ranch, first recorded 1921).
    Now, "tenderfoot" is not to be construed as the Western equivalent of that much evolved and more abused specimen of mankind, familiarly styled "dude." For even the Montana cowboy recognizes the latter. Not that he has ever seen the true prototype of a class that was erstwhile so numerous among us. But he is convinced that a person caught in the act of wearing a white linen collar, and who looks as though he might have recently shaved or washed his face, must be a dude, true and proper. ["Random Notes and Observations of a Trip through the Great Northwest," "The Medical Record," Oct. 20, 1883]
    Application to any male is recorded by 1966, U.S., originally in Black English.
    dudette (n.)
    by 1991, from dude in the surfer/teen slang sense + fem. ending -ette. Earlier (in the Old West sense) were dudine (1883), dudess (1885).
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=Dude&searchmode=none
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Hey Kelly! don't be scared....it's just a thread under your bed, in your closet in your heaaaaaaad! ahahahah :D

    So, let's play it safe: never use dude.

    Chap is too old fashioned, as far as I know, even if I love the sound of this word.......so, could you all suggest a smart word for dude?

    Thank you!
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Note that in British usage, dude = "a name given in ridicule to a man who is ultra-fastidious in dress, speech, deportment and 'form'..." (Shorter OED). It has a feminine dudine.

    I think, in the circumstances, foreign speakers would be wise to avoid the word entirely. In America you'll appear childish, in Britain impolite.
    As Hugo Reyes in Lost series, say "dude"s everal times, like it's his pet-phrase, the film-makers tried to tell us that he acts like a child, and he is not grown up mentally or maybe he is a very simpleton and naive?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I am unfortunately not very familiar with Lost, but while it's possible that "dude" is used to indicate some deficiency on the part of the Hugo Reyes character, it's also possible that they are just trying to make him sound mellow...or Californian...or "hip." "Dude" isn't really hip any more and hasn't been for some time, but that doesn't mean writers won't try to use it that way. There are a lot of possibilities.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top