due for an apology

Shumeyosalt

Member
Italian - Italy
Who's "due for an apology"?

Is it the guy who should apologize or is it the guy who should receive the apologies?

Furthermore, could it be used both ways?

"I'm due for an apology" -> "I gotta give my apologies to someone"

"I'm due for an apology from someone" -> "I deserve an apology from someone"


I'm confused as I've been getting mixed informations from Google.

Thanks in advance
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Normally, I'd read "due for an apology" as "due an apology," meaning that the person deserves an apology.
    I always understand the person "due an apology" as being the one who is owed the apology. The offender owes the apology to the person who is due it.

    I don't think I say due for an apology but admit to feeling slightly confused about it right now.
    I think I say due for something when it is high time I got it, when it is overdue, such as "I am due for a break/a holiday/ a pay rise/ a promotion".

    There's also the ' I gotta....' issue, though I suppose it is in speech. It's strange to be so concerned about one aspect of the language and not about another.

    Hermione
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top