Due to/owing to + gerund

Russulae 🍄🍄🍄

Senior Member
Russian
Can I use the gerund after "due to" or "owing to", for example:
• I'm not currently earning any money due to having quit my job.
• the cat is so jolly now owing to swinging on the chandelier. 🐱
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    You can, in theory, but it's clumsy and may be ambiguous if the gerund isn't clearly linked to a "possessor", so why would you?

    "I told her I wouldn't kiss her due to eating garlic." :thumbsdown: Who ate the garlic - me or her? Who is the "possessor" of the "eating"? (... because I/she had been eating garlic. :tick: )

    "The farmer said he wouldn't buy the horse due to not being castrated." :cross: Who hasn't been castrated, the farmer or the horse? (... because [presumably] it hadn't been castrated. :tick:)

    I'm not currently earning any money because I've quit my job. :tick:
     
    Last edited:

    Russulae 🍄🍄🍄

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You can, in theory, but it's clumsy and may be ambiguous if the gerund isn't clearly linked to a "possessor", so why would you?

    "I told her I wouldn't kiss her due to eating garlic." :thumbsdown: Who ate the garlic - me or her? Who is the "possessor" of the "eating"? (... because I/she had been eating garlic. :tick: )

    "The farmer said he wouldn't buy the horse due to not being castrated." :cross: Who hasn't been castrated, the farmer or the horse? (... because [presumably] it hadn't been castrated. :tick:)

    I'm not currently earning any money because I've quit my job. :tick:
    But if I do this way:
    My dad has to not eat garlic owing to him having gastritis. 🧄
    Is it nice ?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    My dad has to not eat garlic owing to him having gastritis
    Is it that nice
    ok?
    That sentence is grammatically acceptable, especially since you've identified the "possessor" of the gerund (... him having ...), but it's clumsy. Why would we try to find a clumsy way of saying something that can be said much more simply as "My dad can't eat garlic because he has gastritis"? 🤢
     
    Last edited:

    Russulae 🍄🍄🍄

    Senior Member
    Russian
    That sentence is grammatically acceptable, especially since you've identified the "possessor" of the gerund (... him having ...), but it's clumsy. Why would we try to find a clumsy way of saying something that can be said much more simply as "My dad can't eat garlic because he has gastritis"? 🤢
    I just try finding new ways to convey a concrete thought
     
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