Dui ... milits

< Previous | Next >

Gundagai

Member
Australian English
On the will for Sir Robert KILLIGREW, d 1634 it says in the margin "? Dui Roberti Killigrew milits", where the question mark is for something that might be a single letter.

Does anyone know what this phrase means?

The reference in TNA is PROB 11/164/115 Will of Sir Robert Killigrew of Kempton, Middlesex.
 
Last edited:
  • exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    It should be Dni = domini Sir
    milits = militis soldier

    Both in the genitive along with the name.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Thinking some more, in this context miles, the Latin word for soldier, must mean knight.
     

    Gundagai

    Member
    Australian English
    Oh, that makes better sense. I hadn't been aware that he was ever a soldier, but he was a Knight Bachelor.

    Of course, some Olde Englishe novels and dramas show people being addressed as "Sir Knight", to recognise, I suppose, that the person in question was not only a superior, but knighted as well.
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete omnes!

    At the risk of straying from Latin language and literature (please, Moderators, bear with me here):

    'Sir Knight' is of course a rather literary compilation. It owes its origins to the fact that the word 'knight' (a close cousin of German 'Knecht') originally means 'vassal' or 'servant', which of a mediaeval monarch of course he was.

    Σ
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top