Dumy subject "it" vs pronoun "it"

huynhvantinhftu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
(1) "Mom does outstanding things every day. It's just that not everyone appreciates it."

I wonder if the first "it" is a dummy subject, and the second "it" is a pronoun referring back to the whole sentence "Mom does outstanding things every day"

I hope to receive your advice.
Many thanks in advanced.
 
  • SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    (1) "Mom does outstanding things every day. It's just that not everyone appreciates it."

    I wonder if the first "it" is a dummy subject, and the second "it" is a pronoun referring back to the whole sentence "Mom does outstanding things every day"

    I hope to receive your advice.
    Many thanks in advanced.
    Yes, the first one is a dummy it, whose only function is syntactic (the subject of "is"); there's no semantic meaning involved, which is why it gets the label "dummy." The second "it" is a pronoun with a syntactic function (direct object, a necessary argument of "appreciates") and a semantic role (anaphora, it refers to what was previously mentioned).

    There are three types of dummy "it:"
    1. those associated with weather verbs (known as "ambient it"): it's raining, it snowed all day.
    2. those associated with distance ("distance it"): it's a long way home.
    3. those involved with extraposition (which involves the movement of the subject to later in the sentence). That's your example, where the logical subject "everyone appreciates" moves to the back of the sentence: it's just that not everyone appreciates it. This extraposition is motivated by the construction "it's just that," which is really an idiom that introduces a negative statement/judgment.
     
    Last edited:

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Yes, the first one is a dummy it, whole only function is syntactic (the subject of "is"); there's no semantic meaning involved, which is why it gets the label "dummy." The second "it" is a pronoun with a syntactic function (direct object, a necessary argument of "appreciates") and a semantic role (anaphora, it refers to what was previously mentioned).

    There are three types of dummy "it:"
    1. those associated with weather verbs (known as "ambient it"): it's raining, it snowed all day.
    2. those associated with distance ("distance it"): it's a long way home.
    3. those involved with extraposition (which involves the movement of the subject to later in the sentence). That's your example, where the logical subject "everyone appreciates" moves to the back of the sentence: it's just that not everyone appreciates it. This extraposition is motivated by the construction "it's just that," which is really an idiom that introduces a negative statement/judgment.
    Your observations are so informative.
    I thank you so much, SevenDays.
     
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