Dung / Manure / Muck

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Dunno123

Senior Member
Slovak
Hello. I've found three words that mean "waste from animals". I'm wondering what the difference between these is. I've only managed to find that manure and muck are often used in connection with fertilizing land. Also according to Google images it seems that dung doesn't refer to a big heap of waste as opposed to manure and muck. However, I can't see any difference between the latter two based on their definitions and pictures I found. Is there's any subtle difference in usage between them?

Thank you in advance for your opinions, I really appreciate it.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As I understand it, dung is mainly from cattle and horses: it is pictured mainly in heaps (dung heaps) because few people think it is worthwhile photographing one set of faeces on the floor.
    Manure (often adjectivally qualified by either what it will fertilise - vegetable, plant, or its origins - fish, chicken, horse, etc.) includes any organic waste products (mainly but not exclusively animal, and also decomposed and minced bodies of smaller creatures, e.g. fish) likely to improve the soil and/or specific crops.
    Muck is a general term of anything that is reasonably "soil-like" and considered "dirty". It is also a euphemism for faeces and can be qualified by its creature of origin.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Manure (often adjectivally qualified by either what it will fertilise - vegetable, plant, or its origins - fish, chicken, horse, etc.) includes any organic waste products (mainly but not exclusively animal, and also decomposed and minced bodies of smaller creatures, e.g. fish) likely to improve the soil and/or specific crops.
    Note that this is BE usage. I've never heard an American farmer use manure to mean anything other than feces.
     
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