Durazno en almíbar

susantash

Senior Member
Español de Uruguay
Hi everyone!

I'm trying to translate some beautiful lyrics about a little girl.
In the song her skin is described as "durazno en almibar"
and I'd like to know how I could translate the expression so as to keep the poetic impression that the ohrase gives in Spanish. It sounds so sweet in Spanish that a literal translation would never do it justice.

Here's a little more context so that you see the sweet tone of the lyrics:

"Piel de Anahí,
linda, tan linda, durazno en almíbar,
blanquita tu piel de marfil"

I'd offer my own attempt but I don't have a clue in this case, because I need a poetic term, something with a sweet sound that "syrup" doesn't have.
"Almíbar" does have an emotionally sweet connotation, apart from melodious phonetics, so I'd need a term in English with these charcteristics.

(fenixpollo edit: extra words removed from thread title, which must contain only the phrase being translated.)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • susantash

    Senior Member
    Español de Uruguay
    Néctar no es lo mismo que almíbar, pero de todos modos el tema es ver si la construcción funcionaría en inglés. Necesitamos algún postre hecho con duraznos que a su vez suene dulce a los oídos. Tiene que ser un postre o una preparación que tenga cierta lógica, que quien lo lea pueda imaginarse comiéndolo y asociar su dulzura y delicadeza con la piel dulce y delicada de la niña de la canción.

    Me gustó "peach ambrosia"
    Acabo de ver que el postre existe y suena muy lindo a los oídos. Definitivamente mucho mejor que "syrup".
    Let's see what other speakers say. I'd like opinnions of speakers of other languages. Preferably not Spanish natives, because I'd like to test how "peach ambrosia" sounds to their ears. We, Spanish natives, know very well and feel very accurately what "almíbar" represents (we may be biased). So I need to know if "ambrosia" has a similar effect in them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    OtroLencho

    Senior Member
    English - Western US
    Me gustó "peach ambrosia"
    Acabo de ver que el postre existe y suena muy lindo a los oídos. Definitivamente mucho mejor que "syrup".
    Let's see what other speakers say. I'd like opinnions of speakers of other languages. Preferably not Spanish natives, because I'd like to test how "peach ambrosia" sounds to their ears. We, Spanish natives, know very well and feel very accurately what "almíbar" represents (we may be biased). So I need to know if "ambrosia" has a similar effect in them.
    "Peach ambrosia" sounds poetically delicious....
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    I'm trying to translate some beautiful lyrics about a little girl.
    In the song her skin is described as "durazno en almibar" and I'd like to know how I could translate the expression so as to keep the poetic impression that the ohrase gives in Spanish. It sounds so sweet in Spanish that a literal translation would never do it justice.


    I'd offer my own attempt but I don't have a clue in this case, because I need a poetic term, something with a sweet sound that "syrup" doesn't have.
    "Almíbar" does have an emotionally sweet connotation, apart from melodious phonetics, so I'd need a term in English with these charcteristics.
    En cuanto a la descripción del cutis, en inglés estadounidense existe el concepto peaches and cream. Explicación.
    Por ello, puedes decir: her skin is like peaches and cream... she has a peaches-and-cream complexion

    Saludos,
    LN
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top