During December or during the month of December?

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  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Whatever you say, don't say during December time. Only morons say that:)
    Must be a relatively rare breed of morons. Never heard it and it would never have crossed my mind to say it. :)

    There is nothing wrong with 2, except that we happen to know that December is a month anyway :D I could say it in formal writing, though.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think you hear December time because it morphs with "Christmas Time" - although OBVIOUSLY that starts well before December - late in August this year I saw the first Christmas Cards in local shops!
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Must be a relatively rare breed of morons.
    It's not that rare, Mr B: at least once a day I hear September time, the nighttime period, during daytime hours etc. etc. etc. ad nauseam. Always said by people who think that the more they say, the cleverer they sound.
    They don't.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I could understand December time as an AE variant of Christmas time because of their obsession with political correctness as they try not to offend non-Christians who celebrate something that isn't Christmas but comes at about the same time of year.

    Happy Holidays!
     

    Via32

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    ...what is wrong with during daytime hours? I think I could easily say that, and don't want to be considered a moron :D Does just during daytime make any sense?
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I could understand December time as an AE variant of Christmas time because of their obsession with political correctness as they try not to offend non-Christians who celebrate something that isn't Christmas but comes at about the same time of year.

    Happy Holidays!
    There are several points I disagree with here, but the one relevant to this thread is that we don't say "December time." :) It sounds like a British thing based on the above posts.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    but the one relevant to this thread is that we don't say "December time.
    Hmm... Robert Goulet (American "crooner") released a track called "December Time". (Quite good, if you like that sort of thing... as smooth and sweet as honey running down velvet curtains, etc. :D)
    When the air is filled with twinkling bells
    And the trees are white with crusty shell,
    When the frost is on the windowpane
    It's December time again
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I think what offends ewie's sensitivity here is the pleonastic use of "time".
    We do say "during daylight hours" or "during the day", though.
    :):thumbsup:

    Another favourite with our TV weather forecasters is during the nighttime period [8 syllables], rather than during the night [4 syllables]:mad:
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hmm... Robert Goulet (American "crooner") released a track called "December Time". (Quite good, if you like that sort of thing... as smooth and sweet as honey running down velvet curtains, etc. :D)
    I was going to say that Robert Goulet was French-Canadian, but he wasn't; his parents were. The song was written by one Walter Grieve, about whom I know nothing and can find nothing. This song is his only credit at allmusic.com. I have never heard the song, although I do like that sort of thing. :)
     
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