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Hiden

Senior Member
japanese
When I was a high school student, I was taught that a gerund is not used after during because English speakers tend to avoid repeating the same form after it. Is that true? I agree that a gerund is not used after during, but I doubt the truthe of the reason. I would appreciate any opinions.

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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with the idea that using two words in a row that end in "ing" sounds bad: during speaking ??? during jumping ???

    Maybe that's what your high-school teacher was trying to say, Hiden.
     

    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I agree with the idea that using two words in a row that end in "ing" sounds bad: during speaking ??? during jumping ???
    Thanks for your insight. Yes I think that is what he was trying to say. However, I still doubt the truth of his reasoning. I would appreciate any other opinions.

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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with the idea that using two words in a row that end in "ing" sounds bad: during speaking ??? during jumping ???
    Thanks for your insight. Yes I think that is what he was trying to say. However, I still doubt the truth of his reasoning. I would appreciate any other opinions.

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    You're welcome, Hide. You're certainly free to "doubt the truth of his reasoning". If I understood his reasoning correctly, I agree with him.
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's hard to imagine a gerund following on immediately from a 'during', but I would have thought that had more to with grammar than sonority.

    There are surely plenty of repeated 'ings' in English that cause no trouble whatsoever.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    We do talk about about 'sleeping during the day', for instance, so I am not certain the problem is the sequence of -ing forms, though some people may prefer to avoid that sequence because of the sound.

    (I might avoid it when writing a speech, for instance, because 'sleeping during' is the sort of combination that a speaker may stumble over.)
     

    dipsota

    Senior Member
    Español- Buenos Aires -Argentina
    I think it's a matter of 'collocation' . Don´t say during doing something. Say while doing something. Don't say during someone does something. Say while someone does something.

    During= preposition.
    While = conjunction.
     

    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Thank you a lot, everyone!

    This is just what I have in mind. So maybe I'm wrong:


    A noun that comes after “during” must have the concept of “passage of time,” as in (1), whereas a gerund has nothing to do with such a concept. Thus, if a gerund is used after the preposition, the clause sounds strange because of the semantic clash, as in (2).

    (1) during the winter, the performance, the night, my stay in Rome, the drive home, etc.
    (2) during studying, working, running, etc.

    Any other opinions you may have would be very much appreciated.

    Thank you again

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    dipsota

    Senior Member
    Español- Buenos Aires -Argentina
    During is used before a noun (an activity) to indicate that a parallel action is happening at the same time as that activity. Below is one example


    I fell asleep
    during the film because it was so boring. (The sleeping happened at the same time as the film.)

    Notice that during is followed by a noun, which often represents an activity (during + the film).

    While is used to refer to a background period of time in which another activity happened. It is very similar to during, but it is followed by a sentence (while +subject + verb...), so they are not interchangeable.


    Speaker 1: When did you lose your credit cards?
    Speaker 2 : I think it was while I was shopping in Unicenter.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    'During' can be followed by a gerund, just not immediately so, eg. 'During the filming of ....'.


    ADDED: come to think of it, even that's wrong. "There was a pause during filming"
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's interesting to compare the most popular examples in the BNC and COCA corpuses.
    In both cases during filming heads the list.
    Then come (in the BNC) dreaming and cooking and (in COCA) cooking (ignoring batting, opening and reading, which are mostly adjectives).

    There seems to be no grammatical objection (otherwise the list of -ing words would be endless), so I agree with owlman that it has probably to do with the sound.
     

    ALEX1981X

    Banned
    Italian
    As Beryl says, there are occasions when it sounds OK. Mostly it sounds awkward.

    "During ('the' [perhaps unnecessary]) offloading of the ship, there was an accident." This sounds OK.

    Variation: "During offloading of ships, there are often accidents."
    Is this your last variation acceptable Benny?
     
    Yes, Alex, I think so. And here are some related examples:

    "This copy of the Install OS X...: Apple Support Communities
    discussions.apple.com › ... ›

    Oct 22, 2013 - Re: "This copy of the Install OS X Mavericks application can't be verified. It may have been corrupted or tampered with during downloading.".
    ===========

    A P P E N D I X A - Power Interruption During Updating
    docs.oracle.com/cd/E19095-01/sfv480.srvr/802-3233-27/appa.html‎

    A.1 Power Interruption Recovery Scenarios. If power to your system is interrupted during updating of the flash PROM: 1. Turn the power switch to the Standby ...

    ---
     
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