Dusky fellow

Slange

Member
Denmark danish
Hi! I am doing a translation of a play into danish and I am wondering about the word dusky in this context: "he is a tall fellow, a tall dusky fellow". This fellow is a man from the middle east. Would it be right to describe him as a DARK SKINNED fellow. Or does dusky have a more poetic meaning? If I translate dusky directly from the dictionary and into danish the meaning has more to do with the color of the sky...
Slange
 
  • Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It is poetic. Swarthy is a more common adjective used to describe the physical skin features of middle easterners. It also has a very masculine flavor.
     

    Slange

    Member
    Denmark danish
    It is quite difficult to find a word in danish that gives a more postic sound to it. Unfortunately.
    Love Slange
     

    domangelo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I don't how others feel about it, but I think that swarthy sounds rather negative. Dusky sounds a lot better to my ear.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Dusky" is almost archaic-sounding; "swarthy" also sounds old-fashioned.
    Dark-complexioned is probably the most modern-sounding alternative and the least likely to offend.
    As has been remarked in previous threads, terms like "dusky" are relative, meaning that different skin tones could be described by this term depending on the average skin tone of the specific population to which you are comparing someone.
     

    Slange

    Member
    Denmark danish
    Hi all. And thank you for your replies. I think I will go for the danish word "mørk", which probably dos'nt tell you much, but it means dark. I don't feel the danish laungage has much to offer in terms of finding a more poetic word. Too bad. But this will do okay in the translation I guess. Thank you again.
    Slange.
     
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