Dust particle has <entered> <gone into> my eye

If a dust particle enters my eye, can I use:
Dust particle has entered my eye and I have to get it out.
Dust particle has gone into my eye and I have to get it out.
Is the use of gone correct in my case?
Thank you
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Colloquially we (USA) usually say, "I've got something in my eye". I've never heard it phrased any other way.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The word “enter” would only be used in this context in an academic paper, or something like that.



    cross-posted
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would say, I've got some dust in my eye and I need to get it out.
    And how would you know it was "dust"? I've had an errant eyelash get in my eye. I could not determine what it was until it was removed.

    I think the more inclusive "something" is used more often.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Also, it is virtually never one particle of dust. It might be one particle of sand but dust is so fine that it usually travels in the aggregate. Therefore, as stated above, we would say "some dust".
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I think I would say 'Something's got(ten) into my eye and I can't take it out.' if I wanted to place emphasis on the action (getting in). I would not use 'go in', for some reason...
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    No, gone is not wrong if you do want to emphasize the action, which isn't usually necessary, but it's more natural to say "I've got something (/some dust) in my eye."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    But will would a native English speaker say:
    Something has gone into my eye.
    Take note of this.
    Colloquially we (USA) usually say, "I've got something in my eye". I've never heard it phrased any other way.
    and use it. Don't use anything else.:thumbsup:

    PS:
    And you do not need anything like "and I have to get it out.":thumbsdown: I have never met anyone who "wants to leave it in" ;)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    A: Something is in my eye.
    B: Does it hurt?

    A: Something has gone into my eye.
    B: How fast was it moving? (That's silly, but I'm exaggerating to show the difference.)
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Although 'I've got something (some dust) in my eye' seems fine when we mean it is touching the eyeball, I would not say that something "has gone into my eye" unless I meant something, such as a metal fragment, had actually pierced the eye and become embedded in it.
     
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