Dutch: [ʃ] and "sj," "tj," etc.

Sorridom

New Member
U.S.A. - English
Greetings,

I've seen the tj combination phonetically transcribed as [tj], [tʲ], and [tʃ]; sj as [sj], [sʲ], and [ʃ]; and nj as [ɲj] and [ɲ]. (However, I've not seen any other diminutive suffixes--like -pje and -kje--transcribed as being palatized.)

Also, I know that words of foreign origin like speciaal are pronounced with either [ʃ] or [sʲ].

My question is this: What are--if any--the official, prescribed ways of pronouncing these in Algemeen Nederlands?
 
  • optimistique

    Senior Member
    Greetings,

    I've seen the tj combination phonetically transcribed as [tj], [tʲ], and [tʃ]; sj as [sj], [sʲ], and [ʃ]; and nj as [ɲj] and [ɲ]. (However, I've not seen any other diminutive suffixes--like -pje and -kje--transcribed as being palatized.)

    Also, I know that words of foreign origin like speciaal are pronounced with either [ʃ] or [sʲ].

    My question is this: What are--if any--the official, prescribed ways of pronouncing these in Algemeen Nederlands?

    On my computer some of the symbols you typed didn't appear, so I'm not entirely sure about all that you said. But anyway, the 't' in 'tje' IS palatalised. So the IPA-symbol for the 'tj'-sound would be: 'c'. The same for 'sj', which is pronounced as the English 'sh', and the 'n' in 'nj' too, for example in the word 'oranje' (orange), the 'n' is palatalised. And again, the same goes for respectively the 'p' and 'k' in 'pj' and 'kj'.

    And in the word 'speciaal', the 'ci' is pronounced as the English 'sh'. In Belgium they might use the French pronunciation (where the 's' is preserved plus the Dutch 'j' (as in Engl. 'you')), however, but in Netherlandic Dutch it is 'sh'.

    I hope that was an answer to your question.:)
     
    Top