Dutch: Basic phrases

Phryne

Senior Member
Argieland--Esp/Eng
Hi!!!
I'm studying for a linguistics final and, as examples, I was given these sentences in Dutch, which were enunciated by a two or three year old child. Since I don't understand a lick of Dutch, I have no idea if they are right or not. So, are they correct? If not, would you mind correcting those mistakes for me and translating them into English?

Thanks in advance!!!!!

En wat doen ze daar?

Wordt mama boos?

Weet je n kerk?

Valt ie hier om?
 
  • Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Well, since I don't know if here're any Dutch speakers around, let me try to translate them into English. I'm just a native German speaker, but Dutch is very close to German:

    Phryne said:
    Hi!!!
    I'm studying for a linguistics final and, as examples, I was given these sentences in Dutch, which were enunciated by a two or three year old child. Since I don't understand a lick of Dutch, I have no idea if they are right or not. So, are they correct? If not, would you mind correcting those mistakes for me and translating them into English?

    Thanks in advance!!!!!

    En wat doen ze daar? And what do you do there?

    Wordt mama boos? Will Mum get angry?

    Weet je n* kerk? Maybe: Do I know your kitchen?

    Valt ie hier om? Did he pass this way?

    (*) Doesn't exist, because I didn't find it in any dicttionary!
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    whodunit said:
    Well, since I don't know if here're any Dutch speakers around, let me try to translate them into English. I'm just a native German speaker, but Dutch is very close to German:

    (*) Doesn't exist, because I didn't find it in any dicttionary!

    Thanks!! . Whether you speak Dutch or not, your knowledge is enough for me. I appreciate your comments; they helped me a lot. But... Do you think they are grammatical? Are they missing anything? In the Dutch version, are there any auxiliaries such as:

    And what do you do there? Is this auxiliary "do" in the Dutch construction?

    Will Mum get angry? Is this "will" in the Dutch construction?

    Maybe: Do I know your kitchen? Is this "do" in the Dutch construction?

    Did he pass this way? Is this "did" in the Dutch construction?

    Thank you so much for your help!!! :)

    MJ
    PS, 'n could mean a certain sound a child made instead of a word. Like "wawa" instead of "water".
     

    Rayines

    Senior Member
    Castellano/Argentina
    Hola, Phryne, con una cierta osadía, como estoy estudiando holandés (sólo por internet), me atrevo a responderte alguna de las preguntas, aunque estaría bueno que algún Dutch auténtico las confirme: (hago un mix de ambos mensajes)

    1) En wat doen ze daar? And what do you they do there?
    Is this auxiliary "do" in the Dutch construction? No, ellos dicen como nosotros: "Y qué hacen ellos ahí?"

    2) Wordt mama boos? Will Mum get angry?
    Is this "will" in the Dutch construction? No, el verbo "worden" es algo así como el "become" de inglés. En la oración figura en presente (que para ellos muchas veces equivale al futuro)
    "Willen" significa "desear" (no tiene nada que ver con el auxiliar "will" del inglés).


    3) Weet je n* kerk? Maybe: Do I you know your n* kitchen church?
    Is this "do" in the Dutch construction? No, ellos no usan auxiliar en el presente ni en el pasado (sí para el futuro o el condicional); entonces resultaría: "Conoces n*(?) iglesia?

    4)Valt ie hier om? Did he pass this way? (ésta no la puedo confirmar)
    Is this "did" in the Dutch construction? No, porque te decía que con el presente y el pasado no usan auxiliar, como nosotros, entonces sería: "Pasa por aquí?" (aunque no estoy segura de que ésa sea la traducción. Omvallen es caerse) Pero lo que te quiero mostrar es que no hay auxiliar.

    (ojo,edité este último párrafo)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Rayines said:
    Hola, Phryne, con una cierta osadía, como estoy estudiando holandés (sólo por internet), me atrevo a responderte alguna de las preguntas, aunque estaría bueno que algún Dutch auténtico las confirme: (hago un mix de ambos mensajes)

    1) En wat doen ze daar? And what do you they do there?
    Is this auxiliary "do" in the Dutch construction? No, ellos dicen como nosotros: "Y qué hacen ellos ahí?"

    2) Wordt mama boos? Will Mum get angry?
    Is this "will" in the Dutch construction? No, el verbo "worden" es algo así como el "become" de inglés. En la oración figura en presente (que para ellos muchas veces equivale al futuro)
    "Willen" significa "desear" (no tiene nada que ver con el auxiliar "will" del inglés).


    3) Weet je n* kerk? Maybe: Do I you know your n* kitchen church?
    Is this "do" in the Dutch construction? No, ellos no usan auxiliar en el presente ni en el pasado (sí para el futuro o el condicional); entonces resultaría: "Conoces n*(?) iglesia?

    4)Valt ie hier om? Did he pass this way? (ésta no la puedo confirmar)
    Is this "did" in the Dutch construction? No, porque te decía que con el presente y el pasado no usan auxiliar, como nosotros, entonces sería: "Pasa por aquí?" (aunque no estoy segura de que ésa sea la traducción. Omvallen es caerse) Pero lo que te quiero mostrar es que no hay auxiliar.

    (ojo,edité este último párrafo)

    Thank you very much, Rayines. It was just a guess, and I apologize that I wasn't always right. :eek:
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    Thank you so much.... both of you!!!! I needed to understand why the linguist used these examples, so both of you helped me see it. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: Two thumbs up!!!!!!

    saludos :)
    MJ

    Inés: Genial explicación!
    Whodunit: The "mistakes" didn't make any difference! ;)
     

    Rayines

    Senior Member
    Castellano/Argentina
    Hallo, Whodunit and Phryne:
    Yes, because a "church" isn't the same like a "kitchen".
    Yes, Whodunit, but I guess Phryne's questions where about Dutch structure, more then about vocabulary, and you just helped a lot about it. I love this subject, about the structure of languages: German is widely more similar to Dutch in its stucture than English, or Spanish, don't you think so?
    Dutch groetjes,
    Inés

    Pero Phryne: me acabo de dar cuenta que vos pedías la corrección de las oraciones en holandés, yo no atendí tanto a eso (recién veo que fueron dichas por niñitos.) Si necesitás precisarlo mejor, chiflá (recurriré a algún contacto en Holanda :D ) Aunque me parece que entre Whodunit y yo zafamos bastante......
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    Rayines said:

    Pero Phryne: me acabo de dar cuenta que vos pedías la corrección de las oraciones en holandés, yo no atendí tanto a eso (recién veo que fueron dichas por niñitos.) Si necesitás precisarlo mejor, chiflá (recurriré a algún contacto en Holanda :D ) Aunque me parece que entre Whodunit y yo zafamos bastante......

    No, Inés, ya me han ayudado más que suficiente con lo que necesitaba. Estaba buscando auxiliares, más que nada.

    Mil gracias y saludos,

    María José
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Rayines said:
    Hallo, Whodunit and Phryne:
    Yes, Whodunit, but I guess Phryne's questions where about Dutch structure, more then about vocabulary, and you just helped a lot about it. I love this subject, about the structure of languages: German is widely more similar to Dutch in its stucture than English, or Spanish, don't you think so?
    Dutch groetjes,

    Okay, you're right. My sentence structures were correct, except for the "kitchen" sentence. ;)

    And you're right again that German is much closer to Dutch than English.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Phryne said:
    En wat doen ze daar? And what are they doing there?

    Wordt mama boos? Is Mom getting angry?

    Weet je n kerk? Do you know a church?

    Valt ie hier om? Is something missing here?

    These are my attempts.

    en = and
    wat = what
    doen = do (plural)
    ze = they
    daar = there

    wordt = is becoming, is getting
    mama = Mom
    boos = angry

    weet = (do) know [singular]
    je = you
    n = possibly a shortening of "een" (a)
    kerk = church

    valt...om = fall out, be missing
    ie = possibly a shortening of "iets" (something)
    hier = here

    Hope this helps!
     

    ALOV

    Member
    Belgium- du, fr, eng, sp
    Hello,

    I saw this message very late and as a dutch speaker I can only confirm all that's been said.
    I can add one more detail: there are two exemples of spoken language (that didn't cause any problem for your translation)
    1. 'valt ie' (more correct:valt-ie) is the oral version of 'valt hij'
    2. n kerk = een kerk (normally written 'n, to mark the missing vowels (idem: 'k ben - ik ben, 't is - het is etc.)

    ciao!!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    ALOV said:
    Hello,

    I saw this message very late and as a dutch speaker I can only confirm all that's been said.
    I can add one more detail: there are two exemples of spoken language (that didn't cause any problem for your translation)
    1. 'valt ie' (more correct:valt-ie) is the oral version of 'valt hij'
    2. n kerk = een kerk (normally written 'n, to mark the missing vowels (idem: 'k ben - ik ben, 't is - het is etc.)

    ciao!!

    Ah, dankje wel Alov. Dat met "ie" heb ik niet geweten, dus heb ik "iets" gezegt. Nu denk ik, dat het "Did he fall here?" betekent. Ik lerne het Nederlands nog, en het is altijd goed, als andere mensen je helpen! :D

    Ik heet je ook hartelijk welkom! :)
     

    gorbatzjov

    Member
    Belgium, Dutch/French/English
    Hi Phryne,

    I don't know if your question is already answered. If not, I'm a Dutch native speaker, so let me help you out on this one.

    En wat doen ze daar? -- And what are they doing there? (correct spelling)

    Wordt mama boos? -- Is mom going to be mad? (correct spelling)

    Weet je n kerk? -- Do you know a church? (wrong spelling. I suppose they wanted to write: Weet je'n kerk? This is chat-language or spoken language. The "official" written spelling is: "Weet je een kerk?" However, the entire question does not make any sense in Dutch nor in English.)

    Valt ie hier om? -- Does he fall down here? (wrong spelling. There is a little mistake. The correct spelling would be: "Valt-ie hier om?" This also sounds very bizarre to me. Maybe because I'm a Belgian and not a Dutch person. You can compare Dutch from the Netherlands and Dutch from Belgium like British and American English, so there are some expresions that I understand yet sound bizarre to me).

    I hope I helped you.
     
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