Dutch pronouns

Stéphane89

Senior Member
French (BE)
Hello, I have great difficulties to remember the Dutch pronouns and their meanings. Could anyone give me the translation of the missing pronouns and correct my mistakes please?

I = Ik
You = Je/Jij / (U)
He/She/It = Hij/Ze, Zij/Het, 't
We = We/Wij
You = Jullie / (U)
They = Ze, Zij

My = Mijn
Your = Je/Jou/Jouw / (Uw)
His/Her/Its = Zijn/Haar/ ???
Our = Ons/Onze
Your = Je/Jou/Jouw / (Uw)
Their = Hun

Me = Me
You = Je/Jij / (Uw)
Him/Her/Its = ???
Us = We/Wij
You = Je/Jij (Uw)
Them = ???

Mine = ???
Yours = ???
His/Hers/Its = ???
Ours = ???
Yours = ???
Theirs = ???
 
  • optimistique

    Senior Member
    Hello, I have great difficulties to remember the Dutch pronouns and their meanings. Could anyone give me the translation of the missing pronouns and correct my mistakes please?
    Hoi! Alsjeblieft! I have put in bold where I corrected or added something. Do you understand the concept of stressed and unstressed pronouns?

    Also note that 'ons' (notre) works like an adjective (compare notre=ons, nos=onze), where 'ons' gets an 'e' (thus becomes 'onze') when an adjective in that position would get the -e too.

    I = Ik
    You = Je/Jij / (U)
    He/She/It = Hij/Ze, Zij/Het, 't
    We = We/Wij
    You = Jullie / (U)
    They = Ze, Zij

    My = Mijn
    Your = Je/Jouw / (Uw)
    His/Her/Its = Zijn/Haar/ Zijn
    Our = Ons/Onze
    Your = Jullie / (Uw)
    Their = Hun

    Me = Me, Mij
    You = Je/Jou / (U)
    Him/Her/It = Hem/Haar/Het
    Us = Ons
    You = Jullie (U)
    Them = Hun/Hen, Ze

    Mine = van mij, de mijne/die van mij/het mijne/dat van mij
    Yours = van jou, de jouwe/die van jou/het jouwe/dat van jou
    His/ = van hem, de zijne(archaic)/die van hem/het zijne (archaic)/dat van hem
    Hers = van haar, de hare(archaic)/die van haar/het hare(archaic)/dat van haar
    /(Its) = (ervan?) I don't think this form really exists
    Ours = van ons, de onze/die van ons/het onze/dat van ons
    Yours = van jullie, die van jullie/dat van jullie
    Theirs = van hun/ van hen, die van hen/die van hun/dat van hen/dat van hun
     

    Stéphane89

    Senior Member
    French (BE)
    Thank you very much!!! Yes, I understand the concept between stressed and unstressed pronouns. I have still two question: What is the difference between Hun and Hen when they mean Them?

    And I read somewhere that Mine could also be translated by Het mijne and so forth. Is that true and if it is, what's the difference between van mij and het mijne?

    Thanks!!!
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much!!! Yes, I understand the concept between stressed and unstressed pronouns. I have still two question: What is the difference between Hun and Hen when they mean Them?

    And I read somewhere that Mine could also be translated by Het mijne and so forth. Is that true and if it is, what's the difference between van mij and het mijne?

    Thanks!!!

    There's no difference between 'hun' and hen. You can use them as you like. The grammar books say that 'hun' is the dative form and hen the accusative (and for after prepositions), but that's made up. In spoken Dutch you practically only hear 'hun'.

    In addition to that, you have the unstressed ze, meaning 'them', I had forgotten it. In spoken language 'ze' is even more common than 'hun', because 'hun' is the stressed variant of 'ze'.

    Van mij means à moi and het mijne = le mien (celui/celle qui est à moi).
    You're right that 'mine', 'yours' etc. have another meaning. I'll add everything forgotten in my first post.
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    How about m'n and z'n? I see 't is on the list, but what are the differences they have?
    You are right. In fact, the unstressed (spoken) variant of 'ik' is 'k, and that of haar is 'r or d'r. The thing is, not every abbreviated form is that much accepted in written language. So you write 'je' instead of 'jij', because that's what you say, but still we write 'ik' when we say 'k etc.
    't is slightly more accepted, but d'r not at all. It's just writing etiquette.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    You are right. In fact, the unstressed (spoken) variant of 'ik' is 'k, and that of haar is 'r or d'r. The thing is, not every abbreviated form is that much accepted in written language. So you write 'je' instead of 'jij', because that's what you say, but still we write 'ik' when we say 'k etc.
    't is slightly more accepted, but d'r not at all. It's just writing etiquette.

    Good to know. Thank you. :)
     
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