Dyke and floodbank [also: dike]

desponia

Member
Polish
Which one of them should I use to refer to a construction whose aim is to protect an area close to a river from being flooded? Or maybe both of them are correct and can be used in such a context?
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    All the terms seem to be interchangeable to a certain extent.

    Dyke / dike
    :

    • butch: (slang) offensive term for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
    • dike: enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
    • dam: a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
      wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
    Floodbank:
    a formal reception of visitors or guests (as at a royal court)
    A levee, levée, dike (or dyke), embankment, floodbank or stopbank is a natural or artificial slope or wall to regulate water levels. It is usually earthen and often parallel to the course of a river or the coast.
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floodbank
    Levee:

    • a formal reception of visitors or guests (as at a royal court)
    • a pier that provides a landing place on a river
    • an embankment that is built in order to prevent a river from overflowing
      wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
    All of the above (and more):

    • A levee, levée, dike (or dyke), embankment, floodbank or stopbank is a natural or artificial slope or wall to regulate water levels. It is usually earthen and often parallel to the course of a river or the coast.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levee
     
    Last edited:

    Twoflower

    Member
    UK, English
    For what it's worth, I have heard the terms dyke and levée, but not floodbank.

    From SwissPete's definitions, dyke seems more apt, as it focuses on the area to be protected, rather than the body of water to be controlled.
     
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