E Division

Anne Frank

Senior Member
Russian
Hello there! Maybe someone will be able to help me.

Vice squad didn’t have much of a reputation in police circles. Up until two years ago regulating prostitution in the city had been E Division’s number one priority, and a kind of state-run pimping service, since only prostitutes registered with the police could ply their trade legally.

Just tell me please, what does the letter E mean in this text?
The book is Babylon-Berlin again.
Thanks a lot
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi AF, "E Division" doesn't have any special meaning here. The sentences that follow your quote ...
    Many officers exploited this dependence before a new law to fight VD transferred responsibilities from Vice squad to the local health authorities. Since then, E Division’s remit encompassed nightclubs, pimps and pornography, though its reputation had scarcely improved. (100vampirenovels.com)
    ... show that E Division's responsibilities (remit) includes nightclubs, pimps and pornography. Each "division" will have responsibility for dealing with a certain type of crime: A Division might be homicides, B Division might be traffic violations, C Division might be fraud, and so on. It's just a "code" to indicate which division deals with which type of crime.
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suspect there are several divisions, called A Division, B Division . . . , each with different responsibilities - murder, organised crime, fraud etc. E Division seems to be involved in vice.

    Just a guess, since I haven't read the book.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I can't find any online reference to an "E Division" in the Berlin police department.
    When I googled "Babylon Berlin" to see who the author was, I only came up with a German TV series based on the novels by Volker Kutscher.
    Please tell us the name of the author of the book you found this in. Are you reading a translation?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The novel is set in the 1930s so the fact that the current Berlin Police Department is divided into 6 numbered divisions isn't helpful. :)
     

    Anne Frank

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I can't find any online reference to an "E Division" in the Berlin police department.
    When I googled "Babylon Berlin" to see who the author was, I only came up with a German TV series based on the novels by Volker Kutscher.
    Please tell us the name of the author of the book you found this in. Are you reading a translation?
    He is it: Volker Kutscher.
     
    Last edited:

    Anne Frank

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi AF, "E Division" doesn't have any special meaning here. The sentences that follow your quote ... ... show that E Division's responsibilities (remit) includes nightclubs, pimps and pornography. Each "division" will have responsibility for dealing with a certain type of crime: A Division might be homicides, B Division might be traffic violations, C Division might be fraud, and so on. It's just a "code" to indicate which division deals with which type of crime.
    I understand, but maybe there is a word related to a type of crimes behind the E. That's what my question was about
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think the others have explained the meaning of "E Division" pretty well above.
    I'm still curious though about your text, which is in English.
    If you are reading it in English, it must be translated from the German.
    Who is the translator?
    There may be no "E Division" in the Berlin police department. The translator may have chosen the English term in use by police departments where the translator lives which best approximates the duties performed by the Berlin police officers.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think the others have explained the meaning of "E Division" pretty well above.
    There is no obvious English word that "E" might stand for (if it does stand for anything, it's a word in German which may not translate to a word starting with "E"). It's more likely the divisions are A, B, C, D, E, ... just as the current Berlin police department has 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.
     

    Anne Frank

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think the others have explained the meaning of "E Division" pretty well above.
    I'm still curious though about your text, which is in English.
    If you are reading it in English, it must be translated from the German.
    Who is the translator?
    There may be no "E Division" in the Berlin police department. The translator may have chosen the English term in use by police departments where the translator lives which best approximates the duties performed by the Berlin police officers.
    Translation © Niall Sellar 2016
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I couldn't agree more, Myridon.
    In fact, my comment about "E Division" being pretty well explained referred to the explanations given by Enquiring Mind and Heypresto, who pretty much said the same thing as you did in your post #11.
     

    Anne Frank

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There is no obvious English word that "E" might stand for (if it does stand for anything, it's a word in German which may not translate to a word starting with "E"). It's more likely the divisions are A, B, C, D, E, ... just as the current Berlin police department has 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.
    Maybe you are right, but I need to know what does the English-speaking countries' system look like, to compare it to something in English. If it comparable somehow.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Maybe you are right, but I need to know what does the English-speaking countries' system look like,
    There is no such thing, of course. The naming or numbering systems of subordinate units used by police in one American city or county can be completely different from those of a neighboring city or county -- and that is just in one country. Why in the world would you then suppose that there is a single system used by all the police departments in the UK, and that system is the same one used in Ireland, and in Canada, and in the US, and in New Zealand?

    It is very, very, very obvious that "E Division" is part of a series of commands that includes "A Division", "B Division", and "C Division." It is no more complicated than that.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Different English-speaking countries will probably all have different 'systems', and they maybe even be different in different states or cities. I don't think they will be relevant in your understanding of E Division in your book.


    Cross-posted.
     

    Anne Frank

    Senior Member
    Russian
    There is no such thing, of course. The naming or numbering systems of subordinate units used by police in one American city or county can be completely different from those of a neighboring city or county -- and that is just in one country. Why in the world would you then suppose that there is a single system used by all the police departments in the UK, and that system is the same one used in Ireland, and in Canada, and in the US, and in New Zealand?

    It is very, very, very obvious that "E Division" is part of a series of commands that includes "A Division", "B Division", and "C Division." It is no more complicated than that.
    Thank you
     
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