'each made observation' or ' each observation made' ?

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alphabet song

Member
Korean
while reading this sentence, one question came to mind.
' Scientists can lessen bias by running as many trial as possible and by keeping accurate notes of each observation made. '

As none native speaker, I couldn't understand the difference between 'each made observation' or ' each observation made'.

Please explain this point. Thank you in advance!
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    'Scientists can lessen bias by running as many trial as possible and by keeping accurate notes of each observation [that has been] made.'

    It is a very common construction in English.

    The other phrasing, "each made observation" is not idiomatic. I can't think of any case where it would be normal. There are other instances where the past participle could be used like that, no doubt.
     

    alphabet song

    Member
    Korean
    'Scientists can lessen bias by running as many trial as possible and by keeping accurate notes of each observation [that has been] made.'

    It is a very common construction in English.

    The other phrasing, "each made observation" is not idiomatic. I can't think of any case where it would be normal. There are other instances where the past participle could be used like that, no doubt.
    Thank you for answering my question.
    Let me ask you another question.
    In this sentence, valid experiments also must have data that are measurable.
    Can I write ' measurable data' ?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you for answering my question.
    Let me ask you another question.
    In this sentence, valid experiments also must have data that are measurable.
    Can I write ' measurable data' ?
    Strictly speaking, data isn't measurable; data is what is produced by the measurements.
    'Valid experiments must also be measurable'
    If you know the sort of thing that should be measured then you can write 'valid experiments must also have ___ that are measurable.'

    Neither of my suggestions are elegant English, and I would be surprised if anyone objected to 'data that are measurable', but it depends on who will be reading what you write. Scientists, mathematicians and engineers aren't usually noted for their language skills, but they often like words to be used precisely,
     
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