'each piece of accommodation'

  • Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    Probably. Can you tell us what "each piece of self-catering accommodation" is intended to mean, and what the context of your sentence would be?
    Probably. Can you tell us what "each piece of self-catering accommodation" is intended to mean, and what the context of your sentence would be?
    I'm really sorry!
    So, a landlord listed to me three different families that offer self-catering accommodation and I want to ask their cost!
     

    Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    What is "self-catering accommodation"? I've never heard that term.
    It relates to accommodation where you can cook your own food. For istance, if you decide to go abroad and stay in a family accommodation and you don't like the traditional cooking of that place, you can choose self-catering accommodation instead of B&B/half/full board one to eat what you like.
    I hope my explanation is clear (I'm sorry but English isn't my native language!).
    Bye!
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    So are you asking how much the room would cost without meals? Or how much the food to prepare your own meals would cost? (In my version of English, typically "catering" means a company provides a large quantity of food, often for a wedding or a business meeting.)
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Could you tell me the cost of each piece of self-catering accommodation you listed?'
    Excellent question. In British English accommodation is uncountable, and there is no simple conventional solution to render it countable, as there is in the case of a piece of furniture or an item of clothing or a pair of trousers.

    You can say Could you please tell me the cost of each self-catering room, flat and house you listed? OR Could you please tell me the cost of each self-catering unit you listed?
    Serengeti Self Catering Units (Bellville, South Africa) - Apartment Reviews - TripAdvisor

    In American English I have seen the plural accommodations - but in American English it looks like there might be a problem with self-catering.
     
    Last edited:

    spilorrific

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Dear Riva,
    I have never heard the phrase self-catering. It conjures thoughts of going to a very fancy coin-operated machine and getting a 5-course meal to fall out of the machine somehow. Americans do not use that phrase.
    An example that might help you with vocab: If one goes to the beach (or, in the PA/NY/NJ area of the east coast of the US, the "shore"), one can rent an "efficiency" or "efficiency apartment" where one cooks his/her own meals. This is typically the route taken to save money instead of taking all meals in either the hotel's dining room or a separate restaurant elsewhere in the town.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    in American English it looks like there might be a problem with self-catering.
    It seems so! It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with being abroad. It's common in the UK and makes for ideal family accommodation especially if somebody other than the mother does the cooking.
    'Self-catering' means you do your own catering- you purchase and prepare the food. I suppose there might be self-catering apartments with a kitchen ( I know there are hotel apartments like this because we stayed in one for three months) but in the UK it often refers to holiday cottages or houses. All you pay for is 'lodging' not 'board'.
    The word 'units' could be used in this context instead of 'pieces', but I advise using the names of the different types of accommodation. It surprises me very much that the prices aren't given alongside each unit's description, but that's assuming this is a brochure listing the individual places.
    'Establishment' is another word - "Please tell me how much the different sorts of self-catering establishment cost" - if it's clear you mean self- contained apartments/flats vs apartments in a house vs houses vs 'others'.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    For what the UK people are calling "self-catering," I suppose we would say "room only," or much more likely we would say nothing at all, because it's so rare for any type of room or house rental to include any meals at all. If it's a bed and breakfast, we would expect, well, breakfast to be included, but any other type of lodging would be assumed to provide no meals unless otherwise specified.
     

    Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    So are you asking how much the room would cost without meals? Or how much the food to prepare your own meals would cost? (In my version of English, typically "catering" means a company provides a large quantity of food, often for a wedding or a business meeting.)
    The former.
    'Catering' is the activity of providing and serving food and drinks at weddings, parties etc. done, for example, by companies.
     

    Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    Excellent question. In British English accommodation is uncountable, and there is no simple conventional solution to render it countable, as there is in the case of a piece of furniture or an item of clothing or a pair of trousers.

    You can say Could you please tell me the cost of each self-catering room, flat and house you listed? OR Could you please tell me the cost of each self-catering unit you listed?
    Serengeti Self Catering Units (Bellville, South Africa) - Apartment Reviews - TripAdvisor

    In American English I have seen the plural accommodations - but in American English it looks like there might be a problem with self-catering.
    Thank you very much! What you said in your reply was what I needed!
     

    Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    Dear Riva,
    I have never heard the phrase self-catering. It conjures thoughts of going to a very fancy coin-operated machine and getting a 5-course meal to fall out of the machine somehow. Americans do not use that phrase.
    An example that might help you with vocab: If one goes to the beach (or, in the PA/NY/NJ area of the east coast of the US, the "shore"), one can rent an "efficiency" or "efficiency apartment" where one cooks his/her own meals. This is typically the route taken to save money instead of taking all meals in either the hotel's dining room or a separate restaurant elsewhere in the town.
    I know. Thank you for your precious information!
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    For what the UK people are calling "self-catering," I suppose we would say "room only," or much more likely we would say nothing at all, because it's so rare for any type of room or house rental to include any meals at all. If it's a bed and breakfast, we would expect, well, breakfast to be included, but any other type of lodging would be assumed to provide no meals unless otherwise specified.
    Note that the key difference here is that there are facilities to prepare your own food (that is, to prepare a hot meal from scratch) - a kitchen or kitchen area, kitchen utensils and appliances, plates, cutlery and so on. "Room only" also exists in British English with the same meaning as in AE, which is quite different from "self-catering".
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    For what the UK people are calling "self-catering," I suppose we would say "room only," or much more likely we would say nothing at all, because it's so rare for any type of room or house rental to include any meals at all. If it's a bed and breakfast, we would expect, well, breakfast to be included, but any other type of lodging would be assumed to provide no meals unless otherwise specified.
    But there are some instances where self-catering and catering is a common distinction. For example, when you go to college in the USA, you often live in 'dorms'. In the UK we call these 'halls'. In England, you have a choice to go for self-catered halls, which take the form of 'apartments' with between 4 and 20 bedrooms plus a kitchen, or catered halls, which are large residences of anything up to 100 bedrooms, perhaps interspersed with common rooms, and a large cafeteria where all students have their meals. Does something similar happen in the USA?

    I bring this up just to clarify the difference between self-catered holiday accomodation, which will consist of a hotel room or private cottage/apartment/suite with a kitchen, and long-term self-catered accomodation. Either way, 'self-catered' is just a way of indicating that apartments have a kitchen, and there is no cafeteria in which to have your meals. Catered residences of this kind are usually for specific subsets of people such as OAPs or college students.
     

    Riva 11

    New Member
    Italian
    It seems so! It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with being abroad. It's common in the UK and makes for ideal family accommodation especially if somebody other than the mother does the cooking.
    'Self-catering' means you do your own catering- you purchase and prepare the food. I suppose there might be self-catering apartments with a kitchen ( I know there are hotel apartments like this because we stayed in one for three months) but in the UK it often refers to holiday cottages or houses. All you pay for is 'lodging' not 'board'.
    The word 'units' could be used in this context instead of 'pieces', but I advise using the names of the different types of accommodation. It surprises me very much that the prices aren't given alongside each unit's description, but that's assuming this is a brochure listing the individual places.
    'Establishment' is another word - "Please tell me how much the different sorts of self-catering establishment cost" - if it's clear you mean self- contained apartments/flats vs apartments in a house vs houses vs 'others'.
    Thank you so much! You added further useful information!
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Note that the key difference here is that there are facilities to prepare your own food (that is, to prepare a hot meal from scratch) - a kitchen or kitchen area, kitchen utensils and appliances, plates, cutlery and so on. "Room only" also exists in British English with the same meaning as in AE, which is quite different from "self-catering".
    Oh, I see. I don't think there's a standard word for this - Disney's hotels call them "villas," and I've seen "suite/apartment with kitchenette," or there would just be some mention in the promotional materials about "kitchen facilities available."

    But there are some instances where self-catering and catering is a common distinction. For example, when you go to college in the USA, you often live in 'dorms'. In the UK we call these 'halls'. In England, you have a choice to go for self-catered halls, which take the form of 'apartments' with between 4 and 20 bedrooms plus a kitchen, or catered halls, which are large residences of anything up to 100 bedrooms, perhaps interspersed with common rooms, and a large cafeteria where all students have their meals. Does something similar happen in the USA?
    Some dorms have kitchens, many do not. Generally you can choose to pay for a meal plan or not, regardless of whether there are any cooking facilities in the dorm. (So you would have a fee for "housing," which would be with or without "board.") The trend has been towards offering a pre-paid card which can be used in various places around campus for meals, but I don't know exactly how common it is yet.

    Sometimes there are university-run apartment buildings which would be set up like normal apartments: several bedrooms, a kitchen, and so on. This type of housing would generally not be eligible for the meal plans I mentioned before, although I think some colleges allow purchase of the card-type plan. These would just be called "apartments."

    All of which goes to say, no, I don't think we have a word for it. :D
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think I would say "accommodations with (full) kitchen privileges" . I've seen that before on sites like AirBnB. It means that you are welcome to use the kitchen facilities but you must provide and prepare your own food and clean up after yourself.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with James. If you are dealing with a speaker of American English, you want "kitchen privileges".
    That would be widely understood.

    As you can see, a reference to 'catering' confuses us.
     
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