Easter, Passover

rushalaim

Senior Member
русский
[Mod note: Thread split from here]


What is/are the most common way(s) to say “Easter” and “Passover” in your language?

I know that many languages use similar words, if not the same word, given that these two holidays are closely related.

Amongst English-speakers, I must say that I have the impression that a lot of people are not aware of the relation between them (myself included in the past), and I think it’s partly because we call them two completely different things in English. Not that I’m an expert, but I found myself explaining the Cole’s notes version of the history of these holidays to a colleague yesterday.


Thanks
Russian [pascha] means as the name of the Christ's Resurrection Day (Sunday) as the Paschal curd-cheese meal.
Greek [pascha] derived from Aramaic *[patska] (today [pitscha-depatirei] "deliverance [by means of] many unleavened bread [pancakes]". An earlier variant was [patirei depasak] "[many pancakes of] unleavened bread of Pasak"). Aramaic "Pascha" nor any Hebrew word nor "to skip over".
English "Easter" is Babylonian "Ishtar" or later Middle-Eastern "Astarte" (English "[morning] star").
 
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  • rushalaim

    Senior Member
    русский
    That's very unlikely. When and where did Germanic tribes and Babylonians make contact?
    As far as I know Norwegians and Englishmen used 7 days week with a god per every day of a week, for example, "Thursday" was a day of Thur-god, and so on. 7 days week is taken from Babylon. Thus, apparently, there was contact.
    By the way, Bible heroes like Esther's name is Babylonian Ishtar-goddess (Venus in Rome), and Mordecai is Babylonian Marduk-god.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    As far as I know Norwegians and Englishmen used 7 days week with a god per every day of a week, for example, "Thursday" was a day of Thur-god, and so on. 7 days week is taken from Babylon. Thus, apparently, there was contact.
    By the way, Bible heroes like Esther's name is Babylonian Ishtar-goddess (Venus in Rome), and Mordecai is Babylonian Marduk-god.
    ??? The Germanic tribes took over the Roman calendar. We don't know if they had an own one.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    English "Easter" is Babylonian "Ishtar"
    Easter is a Germanic word meaning dawn and is related to the name of the cardinal direction East. So far there is general scholarly consensus.

    But why it this word is used to translate Latin Pascha is another story. The old theory is that it was the name of an unknown Germanic spring feast, where an otherwise unknown goddess of the dawn (with spring being the "dawn" of the year). This theory is still found in some dictionaries, e.g. in Wiktionary, but is generally rejected now.

    The alternative theory is that it is a translation of early Frankish Church Latin albae paschales for the Easter week, which refers the white (=alba) dresses in which the newborns where baptized at Easter, mistaking alba as meaning dawn, a Vulgar Latin meaning from which French aube=dawn is derived.
     
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