educate people to be patriotic?

Can we say "educate somebody to do something" as in "Our government always views hosting some big sports events as a golden opportunity to educate people to be patriotic"? Acutally this is a sentence I used in my email to a German. A lot of times I confirm collocations I use in my letters on the Internet and can get many search results that tells me mine are OK but when I go to my dictionay, oftentimes I fail to find the collocation I want. I just do not know which to follow. Do I still need to check again whether a certain collocation appears in a native speaker's article and therefore it is correct?
Thanks.
Richard
 
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  • rainbow84uk

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    It makes sense but it sounds a little strange to me. I'd probably say 'to encourage people to be more patriotic' or 'to make people more patriotic'.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I think "educate people to ..." sounds OK.

    You will find all kinds of strange usage on the internet, from native speakers as much as from non-natives. On the other hand, dictionaries will give only a limited selection of all possible usages.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Hi Omyrichard,


    I'm not sure about educating someone to be patriotic, but if I were writing the sentence, I'd probably say "encourage someone to be patriotic".

    I think this way because I believe patriotism is something you feel, rather than something you learn, but then again, it doesn't mean that some countries don't actively teach it. You may get different answers.


    I don't know if you will always find the evidence you are looking for on whether a certain sentence is spoken or not, but you could certainly ask here.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    A related question. In Hebrew we say things like "educate to responsibility", "educate to democracy". What would be the idiomatic way to say that in English?
     
    It makes sense but it sounds a little strange to me. I'd probably say 'to encourage people to be more patriotic' or 'to make people more patriotic'.
    Thanks, Rainbow84uk. When I write in English, a lot of thinking and confirming are always involved in the writing process. I just try very hard not to sound strange to recipients of my letters. Perhaps reading more is the only way out. But you know, there's always more and more and still more to read and learn. And sometimes I just feel tired of trying to make what I write 100 percent correct. But if I demand less of myself and write at will, most probably I will slip into Chinglish(literal translation of Chinese words or sentences when I cannot think of something appropriate), which may embarrass you native speakers.
    Thanks again.
     
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    I think "educate people to ..." sounds OK.

    You will find all kinds of strange usage on the internet, from native speakers as much as from non-natives. On the other hand, dictionaries will give only a limited selection of all possible usages.
    You are right dictionaries give only a limited selection of all possible usages. But the Internet gives too many, some of which cannot be trusted. By the way, I'm not sure whether "trust" can be used of things rather people.
    Thanks.
    Richard
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think "educate people to ..." sounds OK.

    You will find all kinds of strange usage on the internet, from native speakers as much as from non-natives. On the other hand, dictionaries will give only a limited selection of all possible usages.
    Sorry, I don't quite understand what you are saying. Do you mean that "educate people to be / to doing" is OK? How about "educate people to responsibility / pluralism"?
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    I can see your point now on educating patriotism, it is more a case of forcing the concept on the people, rather than encouraging enthusiasm, which is what my suggestion means. From your description I would say it is more a case of the government in your country wanting compulsary patriotism, but I fear it is far too political for me to pass an informed opinion.

    I would love to give you my views on the Oympic games but wonder if we're allowed to do this in the culture section, as I know we won't be able to here.
     
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