effective/efficient

Qomi

Senior Member
Turkland/Turkish
Hi there, for the following question, I think B is the correct answer. However, I'm not sure about the exact difference between these two choices. The key suggests A as the correct answer.

Canning is one of the most --- means of preserving a large part of our food supply.

a. effective
b. efficient
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    The following citation is from one of my favorite references, Dictionary.com, which provides several sets of results for each word.
    "Effective is applied to that which has the power to, or which actually does, produce an effect: an effective action, remedy, speech. Efficient (applied also to persons) implies the skillful use of energy or industry to accomplish desired results with little waste of effort: efficient methods; an efficient manager."
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/effective
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    In practice, native English speakers often make very little distinction between these words. I often read of someone or something described as 'effective and efficient', where plainly they're just using the two for the sound of it - they're not really thinking of two clearly distinct meanings. (And I find this very annoying, for the record.)
     

    Qomi

    Senior Member
    Turkland/Turkish
    The following citation is from one of my favorite references, Dictionary.com, which provides several sets of results for each word.
    "Effective is applied to that which has the power to, or which actually does, produce an effect: an effective action, remedy, speech. Efficient (applied also to persons) implies the skillful use of energy or industry to accomplish desired results with little waste of effort: efficient methods; an efficient manager."
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/effective
    Judging from that definition, efficient seems to be more probable.
     
    Last edited:

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Judging from that definition, efficient seems to be more probable.
    I humbly beg to differ. I believe effective is the word. Having a small experience myself with home canning, I know that it works (is effective) but I'm also aware that it requires an enormous amount of energy (both fuel and muscle/time).
     

    pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    I humbly beg to differ. I believe effective is the word. Having a small experience myself with home canning, I know that it works (is effective) but I'm also aware that it requires an enormous amount of energy (both fuel and muscle/time).
    Compared to what though - blast freezers? I assume they use machine rather than muscle for large amounts of food.

    Either answer could be considered correct but with a rather different meaning.
     
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