eggcorn / malapropism

Richard Heavrin

New Member
American English(Southern/Midwestern)
Is there a word for when someone uses the wrong word in a sentence but the other person still understands what the person meant?(not meant in a humorous way)
ex "Please be more Pacific with your answer." Where the understanding is to be more specific not talking about an ocean.
 
  • lordignus

    Senior Member
    British English
    Give us an example sentence of where/how you want to use this word, and we might be able to come up with something :)
     

    Richard Heavrin

    New Member
    American English(Southern/Midwestern)
    Give us an example sentence of where/how you want to use this word, and we might be able to come up with something :)
    I am looking for more of a glossary term. I had found the word many years ago but have since forgotten it and all I can find online is mental disorders.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Are you thinking of a malapropism? Malapropism - Wikipedia
    "A malapropism (also called a malaprop or Dogberryism) is the use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound, resulting in a nonsensical, often humorous utterance"
    They may be humorous, but not (necessarily) intentionally.

    It was reported in New Scientist that an office worker had described a colleague as "a vast suppository of information" (i.e., repository or depository). The worker then apologised for his "Miss-Marple-ism" (i.e. malapropism).[21] New Scientist noted this as possibly the first time anyone had uttered a malapropism for the word malapropism itself.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think our OP will have to decide which fits his intent better:)

    An eggcorn differs from a malapropism, the latter being a substitution that creates a nonsensical phrase. Classical malapropisms generally derive their comic effect from the fault of the user, while eggcorns are substitutions that exhibit creativity or logic.[3] Eggcorns often involve replacing an unfamiliar, archaic, or obscure word with a more common or modern word ("baited breath" for "bated breath").[4]
     

    Richard Heavrin

    New Member
    American English(Southern/Midwestern)
    Thank you
    This helps a lot
    The main thing I was looking for was an accidental substitution of a word without numerous intent. I think malapropism may fit the best.
    Thank you again
     
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