'ei' or 'hey' sound following at the end [eh]

Disneyesque

Senior Member
Korean 
I met some of people (from South Africa, and perhaps US as well) putting something like 'hey' or 'ei' at the end.
I don't know how to spell it. I thought it would be 'hey', but for me it sounds like 'ey'.

I think it means 'isn't it?', or expresses shrugging.. or means nothing... The whole sentences make sense, without the sound.

The usages may be; 'You look nice today, ey.' or 'You are daiting with him, ey.' are the examples for the usage of the sound.
I don't know how I exactly spell it. Do you know what I mean? If so, what is the reason somebody put it at the end?
 
  • Disneyesque

    Senior Member
    Korean 
    Oh, it was neither hey nor ey; it's 'eh'! And it is mainly used by Canadians, but often used in US/UK.
    In US it is used to mock Canadian people. And in UK it's not used to mock, but used to say yes, or re-asking 'what?'.
    Any other thoughts?

    I became to love it, for it's simple-
    It seems that every declarative sentence can be a questioning sentence thanks to 'eh', which is only sounded for a sec. Can I?

    But the part of New Zealand's Eh, it is describing that the usage of 'eh' can represent/be used to mock 'lower socioeconomic status'.
    Is that only the case in NZE? Any opinions?
     

    Disneyesque

    Senior Member
    Korean 
    Well, after reading all the articles, couldn't find the answer to this;
    Can the usage of 'eh' (which follows at the end of the sentence) symbolise 'lower socioeconomic status'?
    I wish to use 'eh', for it is simple and sounds slightly delightful to me, but hesitate to use it after viewing the phrase on the paragraph describing the usage of 'eh' in NZE.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    No, it doesn't signal lower socio-economic status to me. It is more a regional thing: people from certain places use it more than others. Americans are more likely to replace it with 'huh', it seems to me.
     

    Disneyesque

    Senior Member
    Korean 
    Yes! Thank you. I didn't want to take a risk, if it is comfortable yet considered to be the one of lower class.
    I sometimes used 'huh' (didn't know that is American), but I will use 'eh' too. 'eh' (which sounds like eeeyii) sound so cute for me.
     
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