einen / seinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen / machen / halten

< Previous | Next >

JClaudeK

Senior Member
Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
Von dieser Diskussion abgespaltet: driving further

Warum nehmen wir nicht alle unseren Schönheitsschlaf?"
Auf meine Korrektur hin
Warum nehmen machen wir nicht alle unseren Schönheitsschlaf?"
hatte j-Adore geschrieben, er habe geglaubt, man könne "einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen oder machen" sagen.

"einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" klingt für mich vollkommen unidiomatisch.
Ich würde sagen "ein Schönheitsschläfchen machen".

Haltet Ihr "einen Schlaf / ein Schläfchen nehmen" für möglich?
(Im Internet habe ich einige Belege für "Schläfchen nehmen" gefunden, aber die schienen mir nicht sehr zuverlässig.)
 
  • j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    • "Nimm deinen Schönheitsschlaf."

      vs "Mache deinen Schönheitsschlaf."

    I just discussed this with our two corporate German translators, and they say that in the case of "deinen/unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" -- as opposed to "einen Schlaf / ein Schläfchen nehmen" -- "nehmen" is perfectly fine to use in colloquial settings. One of them seems to have even used the very same phrasing in his translation.

    @elroy Natives will naturally have their own perceptions of what seems right in German, based on their individual backgrounds, without particularly needing to consult dictionaries and such. I'm curious -- Is your agree based on something concrete, some real-life experience? Like, "I've heard/read about 'Schönheitsschlaf' here" or something? If so, some reference would be appreciated.
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    "einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" klingt für mich vollkommen unidiomatisch.
    To be precise, this is not what I've written. "deinen/unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" is what I have in mind -- as opposed to "einen Schlaf / ein Schläfchen nehmen".
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    Anyway, "Schlaf nehmen" :thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    Like I've already mentioned at #4, "Schlaf/Schläfchen" is NOT what I wrote. This is a phrase you came up with yourself. Please read the part "in the case of ~~~" again.

    What I'm talking about here is "Schönheitsschlaf -- and with a possessive pronoun, at that: "deinen<etc> Schönheitsschlaf".

    "unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" is even worse, IMO.
    Interesting that our translators have completely different opinions. They say that you've got two different phrasings mixed up and "deinen<etc> Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" should be seen as sort of a fixed expression.
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Interesting that our translators have completely different opinions. They say that you've got two different phrasings mixed up and "deinen<etc> Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" should be seen as sort of a fixed expression.
    Ich habe nichts durcheinandergebracht:
    Schlaf etc. + nehmen :thumbsdown: - egal in was für Varianten! Dieses Urteil wurde hier doch zur Genüge bestätigt, oder?
    Ich verstehe gar nicht, warum Du Dich auf diese seltsame Kombination versteifst. Was gefällt Dir daran so sehr?


    P.S.
    Deine Kollegen scheinen sich nicht bewusst zu sein, dass das eine (unmögliche) 1:1 Übersetzung aus dem Englischen ist: "take a nap".

    Vielleicht kommt es ja mal später soweit, dass sich auch das noch einbürgert, wie schon so vieles andere (über YouTube Videos :rolleyes:) !
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    @JClaudeK Once again, I'm afraid I cannot keep up with your points. No need to take counterarguments so personally. I've already said everything to be said, so please read them calmly and carefully. Your quoted part at #8 is what one of our translators has said after reading your question -- not something I insist on, as you phrase it.

    I fully trust our German translators' skills, so if they find "unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" to be correct, I cannot just swallow everything you say, just because you think it is right, without discussing further.

    What do you mean by "zur Genüge bestätigt"? Our two translators and I stick with A, while Kajjo, Frieder and you stick with B. So I fail to see why you can assert that it is "seltsame Kombination", as if it is an established fact, dismissing further discussion.

    Deine Kollegen scheinen sich nicht bewusst zu sein, dass das eine (unmögliche) 1:1 Übersetzung aus dem Englischen ist: "take a nap".
    No, nothing of the sort.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen"
    The wole phrase would be: "Wir wollen uns Zeit für unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".

    The verb is not "nehmen" but "(sich) Zeit nehmen"

    This form would be idiomatic.

    I would prefer it in a slightly more elevated style than "einen Schönheitsschlaf machen".

    Ich würde mir jetzt auch mal zehn Minuten Zeit für ein Schönheitsschläfchen nehmen.
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    I wouldn't use nehmen either. If you don't like machen, how about halten?
    I initially wrote: "I'm under the impression that both 'nehmen' and 'machen' work here". So I've got nothing against using "machen". As for "halten", it didn't come up in our discussion, so it's new to me.


    What I'm specifically talking about here is "Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" -- and with a possessive pronoun, at that: "unseren<etc> Schönheitsschlaf nehmen". Our translators say that "unseren<etc> Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" should be seen as sort of a fixed expression.
    JClaude didn't correctly mention this important point in the Q, coming up with some other similar phrasings instead: "einen Schlaf / ein Schläfchen nehmen", "einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Standardsprachlich würde es funktionieren analog zu:
    Duden | nehmen | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition, Herkunft
    in Anspruch nehmen, sich geben lassen
    BEISPIELE
    • Urlaub nehmen
    • ich habe mir [einen Tag] freigenommen
    Es ist aber eine sehr vage Analogie.

    Auch eine "verblasste Bedeutung" (Duden, Punkt 24) könnte es sein.

    ---
    Das ist beides jedenfalls möglich, wenn es als Option auf einem Plan steht. Im Netz habe ich Beispiele gefunden, sowohl für "einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" als auch "sich Zeit für einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In that case, it would be more practical to actually google it: here, here.
    I can't open your first link and the second one is a translation of a book written originally in English, which uses the verb get in this phrase and may have influenced the translator. Unfortunately it happens more often than it should.

    Now that I included the link in the quote, I was able to see it. Yep, originally written in German by someone who has published eight books. This is valid proof, but it still doesn't mean that the other version almost everybody here prefers isn't more common or more familiar to them.
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    which uses the verb get in this phrase
    Oh, I hope the 1st link works now. If you are talking about a literal translation from "nehmen", it's "take" rather than "get".

    If you'd rather go by search results, you can find lots of hits in blogs etc, apart from books.

    but it still doesn't mean that the other version almost everybody here prefers isn't more common or more familiar to them.
    As already mentioned above, this -- which is preferable -- is not the point of the discussion, though. It is solely about the phrase "unseren<etc> Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".

    I initially wrote: "I'm under the impression that both 'nehmen' and 'machen' work here". So I've got nothing against using "machen".
     
    Last edited:

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    It is difficult to talk about literal translations when delexical verbs are involved. But you may be right, most German-English dictionaries give take as the main translation, but they also include others, as you can see here.
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Ich sehe es nicht ganz so kritisch. "Nimm deinen Schlaf" ist nicht idiomatisch, aber "Nimm deinen Schönheitsschlaf" könnte man analog sehen zu "Nimm deinen Urlaub", "Nimm deine Auszeit", "Nimm deine Pause", ... also als eine Art Erholungsphase, die einem zusteht.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    "Wir wollen uns Zeit für unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".
    Yes, that is idiomatic because of "sich Zeit nehmen für etwas", not because of "Schlaf nehmen".

    aber "Nimm deinen Schönheitsschlaf" könnte man analog sehen zu "Nimm deinen Urlaub"
    Ja, scherzhaft oder als Sprachspiel, aber nicht, weil diese Formulierung besonders idiomatisch wäre.
     

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    I've thoroughly discussed this matter with all our three German translators today, so I'll quote what they had to say after reading through this thread. To begin with, they all say that this point may not be immediately obvious, even to natives, but my original phrasing is perfectly fine, especially in a joking tone:

    • "So langsam werden mir die Augenlider schwer. An ein Weiterfahren ist gar nicht mehr zu denken. Warum nehmen wir nicht alle unseren Schönheitsschlaf?"

    Schlaf etc. + nehmen :thumbsdown: - egal in was für Varianten!
    This is incorrect. They say that JClaude has got two different ideas mixed up. In this context, "Schlaf / Schläfchen" should be distinguished from "Schönheitsschlaf". "Schlaf / Schläfchen" is about the act of sleeping itself, so it does not take "nehmen".

    With "Schönheitsschlaf", on the other hand, the focus is not on the act of sleeping anymore, and it should be seen rather as sort of a special activity, in a manner of speaking -- in a similar manner to "Urlaub/Auszeit/Pause", as mentioned by Demiurg. As such, "Schönheitsschlaf" can be coupled with "nehmen".

    Overall, what our translators say largely concurs with Demiurg's view at #21.


    "Nimm deinen Schlaf" ist nicht idiomatisch, "Nimm deinen Schönheitsschlaf" könnte man analog sehen zu "Nimm deinen Urlaub", "Nimm deine Auszeit", "Nimm deine Pause", ... also als eine Art Erholungsphase, die einem zusteht.
     
    Last edited:

    tatüta

    Senior Member
    Deutsch - BRD
    This is incorrect. They say that JClaude has got two different ideas mixed up. In this context, "Schlaf / Schläfchen" should be distinguished from "Schönheitsschlaf". "Schlaf / Schläfchen" is about the act of sleeping itself, so it does not take "nehmen".

    With "Schönheitsschlaf", on the other hand, the focus is not on the act of sleeping anymore, and it should be seen rather as sort of a special activity, in a manner of speaking -- in a similar manner to "Urlaub/Auszeit/Pause", as mentioned by Demiurg. As such, "Schönheitsschlaf" can be coupled with "nehmen".
    Hm, tut mir leid j-Adore, aber was deine Kollegen erzählen, ergibt ebensowenig Sinn wie ihre Argumentation. Hier werden Sachen vermischt und verwechselt, die nicht zusammengehören.

    Im Sinne von Urlaub/Auszeit/Pause nehmen?

    1.
    (sich) Urlaub nehmen: arbeitsfreie Zeit beantragen und vom Arbeitgeber bewilligt bekommen.
    Kann auch reflexiv verwendet werden, muss aber nicht. Der Urlaub ist hier eine rein formelle Angelegenheit, sie bedeutet ausschließlich, dass der Arbeitnehmer die gesetzlich vorgeschriebenen und/oder im Vertrag festgelegten Urlaubstage in Anspruch nimmt, d.h. nicht am Arbeitsplatz erscheint. Nehmen leitet sich in diesem Zusammenhang ziemlich wahrscheinlich aus dieser Phrase ab. Man beachte bitte auch das semantische Verhältnis von bieten/zur Verfügung stellen und nehmen.

    Urlaub machen = im weitesten Sinne eine zur Erholung und/oder privaten Stimulation ausgeführte Aktivität, die in aller Regel einen Aufenthalt an einem anderen Ort als dem Wohnort vorsieht, im übertragenen Sinne jedoch auch zuhause, vgl. ironisch: "Urlaub auf Balkonien"

    Diese Wendung bezieht sich also, ich wiederhole es noch einmal, auf die Ausführung einer Aktivität und entspricht damit folgenden Wendungen mit und ohne Possessivpronomen:

    - einen Mittagsschlaf machen
    - seinen Mittagsschlaf halten
    - ein Schläfchen machen/halten
    - einen Schönheitschlafen machen
    - seinen Schönheitsschlaf halten

    If you don't like machen, how about halten?
    Frieder hat nämlich ganz recht oben: Die idiomatischte Übersetzung in diesem Kontext ist seinen Schönheitsschlaf halten.

    Urlaub haben = von der Arbeit freigestellt sein. Wenn man Urlaub hat, hat man ihn genommen, muss ihn aber noch lange nicht machen.

    Ergo: Es ist unmöglich, "seinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" im Sinne von "seinen Urlaub nehmen" zu gebrauchen. Es handelt sich um unterschiedliche semantische Felder.

    2.
    sich eine Auszeit nehmen = die reguläre Tätigkeit offiziell für eine längere, unbestimmte Zeit (meistens wegen zu hoher Belastung) unterbrechen. Ich persönlich würde diese Wendung ausschließlich reflexiv verwenden, aber diesbezüglich mag es regionale Unterschiede geben; in Norddeutschland ist es auch üblich "sich erinnern" ohne Reflexivpronomen zu verwenden, was laut Duden korrekt ist, in meinen Ohren aber falsch klingt. (Ich halte das entweder für eine durch Synchronisation aus dem Englischen entlehnte Wendung oder ein Überbleibsel aus dem Niederdeutschen, Kajjo, wenn du Lust hast, das an anderer Stelle zu diskutieren, gerne!) Zwar gibt es Überschneidungen zum semantischen Feld des englischen time-out, jenes ist aber sehr viel weiter gefasst als das der deutschen Auszeit. Ein aufgebrachtes Kind z.B., das zur Beruhigung auf sein Zimmer geschickt wird, nimmt im Deutschen keine Auszeit. Wie das allerdings beim Fußball gehandhabt wird, weiß ich nicht. Die deutsche Auszeit entspricht eher einem Sabbatical, kann aber auch im Zusammenhang mit einer längeren Unterbrechung einer sportlichen Tätigkeit (z.B. nach einer Verletzung) oder mit einer längeren Beziehungspause verwendet werden.

    Auch diese Wendung beschreibt nicht die Aufnahme einer Tätigkeit (Aktivität), sondern einen mehr oder weniger formellen Status.

    3.

    eine Pause nehmen = das kann man im Deutschen überhaupt nicht sagen. Eine Pause kann man machen, einlegen oder sich gönnen, bzw. pausieren.

    sich seine Pause nehmen = das kann man im Deutschen nur in einem einzigen Fall sagen, nämlich wenn nicht alle Arbeitnehmer desselben Arbeitsplatzes gleichzeitig Pause machen können und diese zeitversetzt stattfinden müssen. In diesem Fall hat jeder Mitarbeiter den Anspruch auf gesetzlich vorgeschriebene Pausenzeiten, sagen wir mal, zweimal 15 min Bildschirmpause + 1 Stunde Mittagspause.

    Auch in diesem Fall handelt es sich also um eine Inanspruchnahme mit der eine Statusänderung einhergeht und nicht um eine Tätigkeit, letztere kann nur mit Pause machen ausgedrückt werden.


    Zusammenfassend:

    Das semantische Feld von "to take + Akkusativobjekt" ist im Englischen sehr viel weiter gefasst als im Deutschen. Die drei Beispiele deiner Kollegen können nicht mit einer möglichen Verwendung von "schlafen" übereinstimmen. Im Deutschen werden aktiv ausgeführte Tätigkeiten grundsätzlich nicht mit nehmen ausgedrückt, man nimmt z.B. auch keine Dusche, man duscht. Nehmen im übertragenen Sinne, wenn es also nicht im wörtlichen Sinne nach etwas greifen heißt, wird im Deutschen nur verwendet, wenn man dies im übertragenen Sinne tut, etwas in Anspruch nehmen oder etwas aus einem gegebenen Angebot auswählen, z.B. einen Zug oder einen Flug nehmen, logisch, da man sich zwar in dem Vehikel befindet, es aber nicht steuert und daher nicht im eigentlichen Sinne, also aktiv, fliegt oder fährt.

    Das Schlafen ist jedoch eindeutig eine aktive Tätigkeit.

    *
    Es gibt einen einzigen Kontext, in dem ich sich seinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen für zulässig halte und zwar, wenn es im Sinne von sich nehmen, was man braucht, sich etwas gönnen verwendet würde und daher dessen grammatische Form übernimmt. In diesem Fall müsste es jedoch zwingend mit einem Reflexivpronomen verwendet werden und der Bezug müsste eindeutig aus dem Kontext hervorgehen. Ich könnte mir z.B. vorstellen, dass so etwas wie "wenn Sie sich nun häufig abgeschlagen fühlen, sollten Sie auf ihren Körper hören und regelmäßige Ruhepausen einlegen. Nehmen Sie sich ihren Schönheitsschlaf!", in einem Ratgeber für werdende Mütter stehen könnte. Schön fände ich es nicht, aber zumindest möglich.

    In dem von dir zitierten Kontext ist "nehmen wir uns unseren Schönheitsschlaf" nicht nur nicht idiomatisch, sondern falsch; der Kontext gibt es nicht her. Ich kann mir aber vorstellen, dass deine Kollegen es durchaus im Sinne von sich etwas gönnen gemeint haben könnten, bzw. so die Verwechslung zustande kam, denn dies ist das einzige semantische Feld, in dem alle Beispiele untergebracht werden können, nur ist sich etwas gönnen ganz und gar nicht dasselbe wie sich etwas nehmen und etwas vollkommen anderes als etwas nehmen. Trotzdem: "Gönnen wir uns unseren Schönheitsschlaf" ist eine weitere Möglichkeit, die du in Betracht ziehen könntest.

    Ps: Sorry für die vielen Fehler im Ursprungspost , hoffe, ich habe sie jetzt alle gefunden und beseitigt.
     
    Last edited:

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    Im Sinne von Urlaub/Auszeit/Pause nehmen?
    Hi. Not quite. What I was trying to say: "just like these nouns take 'nehmen' usage-wise". Anyway, their main point is that this "Schönheitsschlaf" -- as a humorous expression -- should be distinguished from "Schlaf / Schläfchen".

    One of our translators seems to have used the phrasing before in a novel-like story translated from English into German and distributed across German-speaking countries. "Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" was translated from "get some beauty sleep" -- as an intentionally humorous expression, even in English. Not something we commonly say in everyday conversation, but it's a valid expression.

    Our translators are the cream of the crop, handpicked from countless applicants, so if they all agree on something, I cannot dismiss their views just like that. Not to mention quite a lot of examples found on Google. I need to take stock of both sides of conflicting views.
     
    Last edited:

    tatüta

    Senior Member
    Deutsch - BRD
    What I was trying to say: "just like these nouns take 'nehmen'" usage-wise.
    Gerade "usage-wise" lassen sie sich eben nicht vergleichen! Ich habe mir sehr viel Zeit genommen zu erklären, warum und wie der Gebrauch (usage) von "nehmen" in Kombination mit diesen Wörtern möglich ist und warum er sich nicht auf "schlafen" übertragen lässt. Entweder hast du es nicht verstanden oder du möchtest es nicht verstehen. Was du dazu schreibst, ergibt aus linguistischer Sicht keinen Sinn. Das steht dir natürlich frei. Die von dir verwendete Übersetzung ist trotzdem nicht korrekt, geschweige denn idiomatisch (gleichwohl bin ich mir sicher, dass jeder versteht, was gemeint sein soll).

    Our translators are the cream of the crop, handpicked from countless applicants, so if they all agree on something, I cannot just discount their views. Especially given that one of them seems to have even used the exact same phrasing before in our product distributed across German-speaking countries.
    Argumentum ad verecundiam. Really? o_O
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    "deinen/unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen"
    Nie gehört.

    … halten: sehr gut.
    … machen: gut.
    … nehmen: :confused:

    Nimm einfach eine der ersten beiden Varianten. Du gehst ja auch nicht ins Restaurant und sagst bei der Bestellung: „Für mich bitte das drittbeste Steak!“
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Schönheitsschlaf nehmen: Ich kenne es. Verwendet wird es meist von Frauen, die etwas extravagant gekleidet sind und sich insgesamt geziert benehmen, aber das ist nicht ausschließlich so. Trotzdem ist es selten.

    Ergänzung:

    Es gibt eine Reihe Fundstellen, oft leicht ironisch, aber auch ernsthafte Stellen sind zu finden.

    Allerdings:

    "... meinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" ist die häufigste Wendung.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Es gibt eine Reihe Fundstellen
    "... meinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" ist die häufigste Wendung.
    (insgesamt 18*, bei mir - "ernsthafte Stellen" habe ich darunter nicht gefunden)
    Aber muss man jeden Quatsch aus dem Netz (wahrscheinlich ursprünglich ein Instagramkommentar) nachahmen?

    *darunter auch "von was ich mir meinen schönheitsschlaf nehmen lasse"
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    "... meinen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" ist die häufigste Wendung.
    Nein. Für „… meinen Schönheitsschlaf halten“ gibt es viel mehr Treffer, nämlich 119! Für „… meinen Schönheitsschlaf machen“ immerhin 64.
    *darunter auch "von was ich mir meinen schönheitsschlaf nehmen lasse"
    … und „Mehrfachtreffer“, wo das gleiche Zitat auf mehreren Seiten im Netz erscheint. (Nun gut, das könnte bei den anderen Varianten auch so sein.)
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Es geht ja nicht darum, unbedingt die beste Lösung zu verwenden, sondern darum, die in einer bestimmten Situation geeignetste Lösung. Und auch allgemein um eine mögliche Lösung oder auch mehrere Lösungen.


    Es gibt auch noch:
    "Ich möchte mich jetzt meinem Schönheitsschlaf widmen."

    Das hat oft ebenfalls einen ironischen Unterton.

    (Die Ursache für die Ironie ist "Schönheitsschlaf".)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Sofern es in einem Kontext so ist, gebe ich Dir natürlich recht. Aber es gibt sehr unterschiedlichen Kontext. Einer davon ist sprachliche Charakterisierung.

    Vergleiche mal:

    Ich nehme jetzt meinen Schönheitsschlaf (in Anspruch). Bitte stört mich nicht, diese Zeit gehört mir.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Ich nehme jetzt meinen Schönheitsschlaf (in Anspruch). Bitte stört mich nicht, diese Zeit gehört mir.
    :thumbsdown:
    tatüta hat doch schon überzeugend dargetan, dass seinen Schönheitsschlaf in Anspruch nehmen nicht funktioniert.
    vs
    "sich Zeit für einen Schönheitsschlaf nehmen".
    :thumbsup:

    Ich nehme mir jetzt Zeit für (m)einen Schönheitsschlaf. Bitte stört mich nicht! :thumbsup:

    Edit:
    Ich nehme jetzt meinen Schönheitsschlaf. So, als ob das ein Medikament/ ein Wunderheilmittel wäre? :confused:
     
    Last edited:

    tatüta

    Senior Member
    Deutsch - BRD
    Sofern es in einem Kontext so ist, gebe ich Dir natürlich recht. Aber es gibt sehr unterschiedlichen Kontext. Einer davon ist sprachliche Charakterisierung.

    Vergleiche mal:

    Ich nehme jetzt meinen Schönheitsschlaf (in Anspruch). Bitte stört mich nicht, diese Zeit gehört mir.
    Einen Schönheitsschlaf kann man nicht in Anspruch nehmen, es sei denn, man lebte in einer Institution, in der den Insassen ein bestimmtes Kontingent an Schönheitsschlaf zugesprochen würde, über dessen Inanspruchnahme sie mehr oder minder frei verfügen könnten.

    Der Kontext des konkreten Beispiels (s.o.) ist aber ein anderer: "an ein Weiterfahren ist nicht zu denken".

    Lies doch mal, was ich oben genau dazu geschrieben habe. Wie gesagt: wenn, dann mit Reflexivpronomen.
     

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    Schönheitsschlaf nehmen: Ich kenne es. Verwendet wird es meist von Frauen, die etwas extravagant gekleidet sind und sich insgesamt geziert benehmen, aber das ist nicht ausschließlich so. Trotzdem ist es selten.
    One of our German translators once translated "get some beauty sleep" into "<possessive pronoun> + Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" in a novel-like story. And this line was intended for a female character (in her mid-thirties) who tends to speak in an exaggerated, joking, ironic tone. The translator has confirmed that it was not a typo or anything but he chose to phrase it that way to add a specific voice to that character, as we translators often do.

    And I agree with their views. What our translators say is that "unseren Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" is possible as an expression, not that it is a commonly used phrasing or anything. And this is exactly what I've been saying here all along, too. It's sort of similar to regional expressions: some people use them all the time, others don't at all. "Used, albeit rarely, by some" and "Incorrect" are two different things altogether.

    I've already said everything there is to say, nothing more to add on this matter.
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    One of our German translators once translated "get some beauty sleep" into "<possessive pronoun> + Schönheitsschlaf nehmen" in a novel-like story. And this line was intended for a female character (in her mid-thirties) who tends to speak in an exaggerated, joking, ironic tone. The translator has confirmed that it was not a typo or anything but he chose to phrase it that way to add a specific voice to that character, as we translators often do.
    Yes, I can accept that. That follows Demiurg's argument of "Urlaub nehmen". Even closer this phrasing is to "ein Bad nehmen". If we view it in a context of rather stupid or exaggerated wellness babble, then it might even fit well.

    not that it is a commonly used phrasing or anything.
    Agreed.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top