Either: Both or not?

Nadietta

Member
Italy/Italian
Ciao,
could you please tell me if "either" in the following context means "EITHER your travel to destination (?) OR your travel back must be on a Friday" or "BOTH your travel to destination and your travel back must be on a Friday" ?


Standard Advance Return
Valid where travel in either direction is on any Friday throughout the year or other Standard fare days as notified to Sales agents.



(I need to know this exactly because I am planning a journey and I d like to book a certain coach ticket and I do not want to experience any problems with my reservation :)!

Thanks!
 
  • lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Valid where travel in either direction is on any Friday throughout the year or other Standard fare days as notified to Sales agents.

    Ciao, Nadietta. "Either" in English means "one or the other," not "both."
     

    CubaCelt

    Member
    Ireland, English
    Nadietta said:
    Ciao,
    could you please tell me if "either" in the following context means "EITHER your travel to destination (?) OR your travel back must be on a Friday" or "BOTH your travel to destination and your travel back must be on a Friday" ?


    Standard Advance Return
    Valid where travel in either direction is on any Friday throughout the year or other Standard fare days as notified to Sales agents.
    "in either direction" means it does not matter which direction you are travelling in.

    You must travel on Friday or other days which the agents (ticket agents) will have details of.


    "in either direction" vuole dire non si importa Lei è quale direzione viaggiante.

    Lei deve viaggiare in venerdì o gli altri giorni che gli agenti (agenti di biglietto) avrà dettagli di.
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Whodunit said:
    That's not quite correct. Either could also mean "both" in English (but not in that context):

    Either way is correct. --> Both (of your/the) ways are correct.

    AND NOT "One or[/I] the other way is correct".
    Right, I was too narrow- it means either (;)) one of two or each of two.

    For Nadietta's specific request, I think "one of two" applies.
     

    Nadietta

    Member
    Italy/Italian
    ...Thanks everybody! In short, this mean that I won't get any problems if my outward travel is on a Friday and the return some days later on a Saturday, isn't?

    Have a nice evening! As for me, I can book my National Express ticket at last...:)
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Nadietta said:
    "Either" in the following context means "EITHER your travel to destination OR your travel back must be on a Friday"?

    Standard Advance Return
    Valid where travel in either direction is on any Friday throughout the year or other Standard fare days as notified to Sales agents.
    In short, this mean that I won't get any problems if my outward travel is on a Friday and the return some days later on a Saturday?
    That would be OK.

    It would also be OK if both journeys were on a Friday.

    A small point, nothing to do with this ticket:)
    If your outward travel is on a Friday and the return on a Saturday, then your return is one, eight, fifteen...... days later. Native speakers wouldn't say "some days later" for one day later - and eight seems rather too many to be "some".
     

    Nadietta

    Member
    Italy/Italian
    panjandrum said:
    [/i]
    That would be OK.

    It would also be OK if both journeys were on a Friday.

    A small point, nothing to do with this ticket:)
    If your outward travel is on a Friday and the return on a Saturday, then your return is one, eight, fifteen...... days later. Native speakers wouldn't say "some days later" for one day later - and eight seems rather too many to be "some".
    .Thanks..And what about " a couple of days later"? I mean, if I am too lazy to count the days ;)?
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Nadietta said:
    .Thanks..And what about " a couple of days later"? I mean, if I am too lazy to count the days ;)?
    Excellent!:thumbsup: To be picky, a couple means two, but for most of us "a couple of days later" would mean anything from two to six in this case - more would be "a week or so later":)
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    lsp said:
    Ciao, Nadietta. "Either" in English means "one or the other," not "both."
    Sentences like There are trees on either side of the Mississippi River. cause this confusion. Either does mean "both" sometimes.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Nick said:
    Sentences like There are trees on either side of the Mississippi River. cause this confusion. Either does mean "both" sometimes.
    Yes- we are rather perverse and confusing.

    In Nick's example, either means both.

    In Nadietta's ticket example, either means one or the other or both.

    In many other situations, either means one or the other, but not both.
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Nick said:
    Sentences like There are trees on either side of the Mississippi River. cause this confusion. Either does mean "both" sometimes.
    You did not quote a more recent post of mine with a correction, after Who already made this same point.
     
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