either/both

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navi

Banned
armenian
1-Context can make either of these sentences correct.
2-Context can make both of these sentences correct.


Does replacing "either" with "both" change anything?

I think "1" means in certain contexts one will be correct and in certain other contexts the other one.

"2" could mean the same but could also mean in some contexts both of them will be correct.
 
  • Renaissance man

    Senior Member
    Even though it's usually important to separate either and both, in this particular case the message is the same. Strictly speaking, 2) means that either both are correct or both are incorrect, but in daily speech you could use it to mean the same as 1).
     
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    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Does it mean "Do you have insurance on both of these cars?"
    "Do you have insurance on either one of these cars?"
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    "Do you have insurance on both of these cars?"
    This means: Have you insured Car 1 and also Car 2?
    "Do you have insurance on either one of these cars?"
    This means: Have you insured at least one of these cars? Have you insured Car 1, even if you haven't insured Car 2? Or have you insured Car 2, even if you haven't insured Car 1?
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Here "either" means "both", what is the difference?
    There are gas stations at either end of the block.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    How should I know in the first one it means "one or the other one" but in the second it is "each of two", because they are similar?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Context and structure (and practice).

    In the first, it specifically says "either one". In the second, if only one end was meant, it would have said there was a gas station at one end, or the north end, or something similar.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Does "either team" refer to "both team"?
    I suddenly realized that I didn't hae a single intelligent thing to say about either team."
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Here's a good example that illustrates the difference between "either" and "both":

    Emp: If somebody thanks me for something I have done for the person, should I say "My pleasure" or "You're welcome" in response?

    Donny: You can use either.




    Donny didn't say "both" because only one of the two expressions (any one/doesn't matter which one) is to be used at a time, not both together.
     
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