(Either/Neither usage) "Nothing he is saying is meant ..."

hyakkishu

New Member
French - Belgium
Hello all :)

I wanted to ask about a certain form of sentence using either or neither, for example : "Nothing he is doing is good either for you or for your friend"

I tried to write it that way but don't know if the sentence is correct, how can we correct it without changing its meaning please ? The idea is that there is this guy is doing something but it's neither good for the one you are talking with nor for someone else related to him and you are trying to inform him about it.

Thank you in advance
 
  • Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    What about:

    None of what he's doing is good for you or for your friend.
    None of what he's doing is good -- neither for you nor for your friend.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    hya, your original sentence sounds fine to me. I would just add a comma.

    Nothing he is doing is good, either for you or for your friend.
     

    hyakkishu

    New Member
    French - Belgium
    Ok so actually the problem is with the first part of the sentence ? We can't say "Nothing he sid doing..." we should say "None of what he is doing" instead ? Or de we just need to add of what ?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hello all :)

    I wanted to ask about a certain form of sentence using either or neither, for example : "Nothing he is doing is good either for you or for your friend"

    I tried to write it that way but don't know if the sentence is correct, how can we correct it without changing its meaning please ? The idea is that there is this guy is doing something but it's neither good for the one you are talking with nor for someone else related to him and you are trying to inform him about it.

    Thank you in advance
    For me, separating "for you" from "good" seems to make the statement more general (good at all for any purpose). For the general meaning, I would add a comma since then the "either ... or ..." part is a kind of afterthought.

    But "good for" has another, more specific, meaning: "beneficial/useful/helpful to". For this meaning, it seems odd to put "either" between "good" and "for you", so I would leave it out. But this makes "or for you friend" an afterthought too, and I would add a comma:

    Nothing he is doing is good for you, or for your friend.

    But for the meaning "beneficial/useful/helpful to you or to your friend", I would leave out the second for:

    Nothing he is doing is good for you or your friend.

    (Oddmania's "none of what he's doing" is just as grammatical as "nothing he is doing", but it refers to parts of his action(s) rather than just to his entire action(s).)

    The construction "neither ... nor ..." does not fit this context, but you could use "not .... Neither ....", or any similar construction:

    What he is doing is not good for you, and it is not good for your friend either.
    What he is doing is not good for you; neither is it good for your friend.
    ["Neither + inversion" means "negative + either".]
    What he is doing is not good for you, and neither is it good for your friend.
    What he is doing is not good for you, nor is it
    good for your friend. [As a coordinating conjunction, nor means "and neither".]
     
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