El reglamento obliga a certificar / obliga a los productores a certificar

< Previous | Next >

agromusica

Senior Member
Español (alfabeto internacional)
Hola, quisiera saber como se puede traducir al inglés "..obliga a.." en el sig. contexto:

"El reglamento obliga a certificar el material de reproducción"

o "El reglamento obliga la certificación del material de reproducción"

Esta es una forma abreviada de la siguiente frase:

"El reglamento obliga a los productores de plantas a certificar el material de reproducción"

En español se puede omitir el obj. ind. en este caso: "los productores de plantas" porque se sobreentiende a quiénes va dirigido el reglamento

¿Se puede hacer algo parecido en inglés?

Example:

"The regulation compels to certificate the reproductive material"
or
"The regulation compels the certification of reproductive material"
or
"The regulation compels plant producers to certificate the reproductive material"

(I don't know if "to compel" is the right expression in this case)

Did I explain my self?
 
  • E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I would say 'oblige' sounds better than 'compel' in a legal context.

    "The regulation obliges to certificate the reproductive material" :cross:
    - In English, you need to specify who is obliged (or compelled). No se puede omitir el objeto.

    "The regulation obliges plant producers to certificate the reproductive material" :tick:

    "The regulation obliges the certification of reproductive material" :cross:
    - An alternative construction is:
    "The regulation makes the certification of reproductive material obligatory"

    Espero haberte ayudado :)
     

    agromusica

    Senior Member
    Español (alfabeto internacional)
    Yes, it was very helpful. But I haven't understood at all the use of "to compel "

    I have found some sentences like this.

    "The clear language of the regulation compels this interpretation"
    or
    "If the Board determines that the regulation compels the Intermediary disallowance, the provider further contends that....."

    Here "to compel" doesn't take an ind. object (I think).

    In this two examples the construction isn't "Something compels someone to do something"

    It is "Something (a situation) compels something (another situation)"
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Yes, in these two examples of yours, the verb 'compel' is followed by another noun phrase. You need the object if it's followed by the infinitive with 'to'.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top