elderly age

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Ruzanna

Senior Member
Russian
Hi
I wonder if this collocation "elderly age" is correct and common? As I was searching for the answer, I saw only "old age". What about this one? Is it equally used?
 
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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi
    I wonder if this collocation is correct and common? As I was searching for the answer, I saw only "old age". What about this one? Is it equally used?
    If you're talking about the thread title (in which case it should be in the body of the text) "elderly age" is redundant and I've never encountered it.
     

    Ruzanna

    Senior Member
    Russian
    No, I haven't seen it. I want to translate the meaning from my language into English. By "old age" or "elderly age" I mean the age for elderly people.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you for the sentence. "When we reach old age, ... ." (That's the only point I'm addressing, by the way.)

    "I am elderly and want a comfortable, trouble-free life".
    "I'm in my old age now and regret nothing, done or undone, because regret is pointless."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    One meaning of "age" is "one of the periods or stages of human life".

    We call those periods "old age" and "middle age" and "childhood" and "adulthood" and "youth". You can't substitute other words.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Age is a number. A number cannot be old. (Or: numbers have existed since the beginning of time, so all numbers are equally old.) Since "elderly" mans "old," a number cannot be elderly either. That is why "elderly age" is incorrect.

    A person, however, can be elderly.

    (I often see reports of automobile crashes on the local television news program. The announcer sometimes mentions an "elderly driver." Later, someone gives the driver's age. It is distressing to learn that these "elderly drivers" are usually younger than I am!)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    When we reach old age, we will regret not having done certain things.

    "Elderly" is a politer way of describing an old person, but we don't need to fudge here: nobody's feelings are going to be hurt, since in your sentence "old age" is seen as being still in the future, and it's a general "we". "We" are assumed to be still young or in our prime.

    If you are addressing a group of old people, it's more diplomatic to talk about "the problems of the elderly" or, more euphemistically, "senior citizens".



    ("It is distressing to learn that these "elderly drivers" are usually younger than I am!" :D
    It's distressing, too, when a "middle-aged" person turns out to be the same age as the eldest of my offspring.)


     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Would a euphemism like "an advanced age"/"our later years" work for you here? Or "When we grow old"? By the way, we wouldn't use the article: "When we reach an old age..."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Elderly" is a politer way of describing an old person, but we don't need to fudge here: nobody's feelings are going to be hurt, since in your sentence "old age" is seen as being still in the future, and it's a general "we". "We" are assumed to be still young or in our prime.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    I do answer to "grumpy old fart," however.:)
     
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