Elderly people can get taken in by con men going from....

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werta

Member
Polish
Elderly people can get taken in by con men going from house to house.

-> does this sentence make sense? I have come across it tonight in 'Grammar and Vocabulary for Cambridge Advanced and Proficiency' Side and Wellman's but I cannot figure out what it means. Thanks for your help in advance :)

-> of course not can men byt con man, it was my typo.
 
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  • Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Werta, you didn't explain what you don't understand. "Con men" is short for "confidence men" = swindlers, from gaining the confidence of their victims and then defrauding them. Dictionaries should have further explanations.
     

    werta

    Member
    Polish
    I am interested in the chunk 'can get taken'. It was in the chapter 'passives' so I expected sth like 'can be taken'. Is it an equivalent?
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Well, the full phrase is "can get taken in," which isn't exactly the same thing as "can get taken."

    To "get taken in" is to be deceived, to believe something that isn't true.

    To "get taken" is to be defrauded financially, to spend money on something worthless or worth much less than one spent for it.

    "I was really taken in by the mirage in the desert. I was looking forward to a cooling swim!"

    "I did business with him and really got taken. I paid $100 for something I could have bought at the dollar store!"
     
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