elected by postulation

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Nunty

Senior Member
Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
Further to a thread I opened in the Latin forum, I wonder if anyone here knows if "elected by postulation" is a term that is commonly used today in English. In the context of the Catholic Church, it refers to a person who is legally ineliglible for election because of some impediment. A common example is the re-election of the head of religious Order even though she has already served the maximum number of terms allowed by the Order's constitution.

I'd be grateful for any comments.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I have never heard it before, Nunty. It may be a specialized ecclesiastical term. When I hear anything similar (such as "postulants") I think of something related to the church.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I haven't come across it either, Nunty.

    (In fact, I don't think I've come across the situation it describes, either:(.)
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I believe the key part of your question is if it is common today. As far as I know, it is common to the Catholic faith from what I have seen. I confess I have never heard of it either, as JamesM said. It appears to only be used ecclesiastically.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Well, it was worth a shot. I guess I'll just have to grit my teeth and read up on canon law in English to see if they still use the term.

    Thanks, everyone.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I see I made a serious error in my first post. I doubt that it will make a difference to the replies, but it might make things more comprehensible. I should have written "In the context of the Catholic Church, it refers to a person who is legally ineligible for election because of some impediment but is elected anyway." This is a situation in which the electorate chooses someone who is legally disqualified from the position.

    But I suppose I'll still have to read cannon law in English. :(

    EDIT: Oops, I was so mortified I forgot to thank you, ewie. Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    I see I made a serious error in my first post. I doubt that it will make a difference to the replies, but it might make things more comprehensible. I should have written "In the context of the Catholic Church, it refers to a person who is legally ineligible for election because of some impediment but is elected anyway." This is a situation in which the electorate chooses someone who is legally disqualified from the position.

    But I suppose I'll still have to read cannon law in English. :(
    Yes, I found that term on a Roman Catholic website before I posted my first response.
     

    frenchifried

    Senior Member
    English - UK/US
    I think it is used today. And I think it means electing someone, within the Church, who in church law is not eligible for the post. The voters 'postulate' for the candidate, and if the vote is high enough in favour, a decision is taken to grant dispensation to the postulated candidate.

    Not very clear - sorry.
     
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