Electoral district

Aventador LP700-4

Senior Member
Persian
What does the phrase " his home electoral district " mean in the following context?

Because of our role as a major employer, I've exchanged ideas frequently with British prime ministers, including Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. I also had the opportunity to visit them at No. 10 Downing Street, and Tony Blair was a frequent visitor to our factory in Sunderland, his home electoral district.

Source:
What drives Carlos Ghosn chapter 7: Current state of business

Does it mean that Tony Blair's home was located in electoral district?

I don't understand the phrase.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    An electoral district is the area that contains the population that are entitled to elect one Member of Parliament.

    "Home (adj.)," in this case, does not concern residence (although Blair would have had a house there) - in this case his home electoral district means "the electoral district that provides the basis of his support as a Member of Parliament" / "the electoral district where his support as a Member of Parliament is based."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Obviously not written by a BE speaker, since there is no such thing as an "electoral district" in Britain. It also means that Mr Goshn's knowledge of English geography is a little lacking. Tony Blair's constituency was Sedgefield, some 20 miles away from Sunderland, with two other constituencies between Sunderland and Sedgefield. The text suggests that Blair was elected by people in Sunderland, but he wasn't.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    but the basis of his support for what? Supporting what?
    What do you think? :)

    Tony Blair was a politician - he needed to be elected - to be elected he needed votes - to obtain votes he needed people to support his ideas and support his attempt to become a Member of Parliament by casting their votes for him.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    but after they are elected, they represent us but we don't support them
    I read such things as "support for the president remains strong" and "support for <name of politician>'s policy is strong in the Rust Belt". "Her support base is diminishing" - are these Anglicised (and opposed to Americanized) phrases?

    Also:
    his support as a Member of Parliament -> the support that put him in the position of a Member of Parliament.
     
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