Embankment or waterfront?

Pesenka

New Member
Russian
I wonder what's the correct name for a street next to a river: an embankment or a waterfront/riverfront? E.g. let's walk along the ...
 
  • Linguisticks

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    A street next to a river could be called either a riverfront street or a waterfront street. "Waterfront" is usually used for larger bodies of water, like the sea.

    An embankment isn't a street. It's a wall or bank of earth or stone built to contain a river. You could walk along an embankment. You could also walk along a street that's next to a river, or a street that follows a river.
     

    glamorgan

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    I wonder what's the correct name for a street next to a river: an embankment or a waterfront/riverfront? E.g. let's walk along the ...
    If the river carries, or used to carry, boats or barges towed by horses, the path beside it, where the horses walked, would be called a towpath.

    Some towns have street names like "Quay Street" = the street leading to the quay(s), and quays themselves may have specific names such as "Merchant's Quay".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    You're forgetting that the Victoria Embankment is indeed a street in London, and Embankment is the area around it. I have no doubt the same applies to other streets in other towns.
    Yes, but these streets run along embankments, which were essentially built as a form of land reclamation. In this picture showing the Victoria Embankment being built, you can see how much land was taken from the river.
    1574682417136.png


    I wonder what's the correct name for a street next to a river: an embankment or a waterfront/riverfront? E.g. let's walk along the ...
    By all means call it an embankment if it is one, or if the street has "embankment" in its name. You can always use "along the waterfront" or "by the river". I don't recall "riverfront" being used much, but it is not wrong.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I hate to be picky, but
    which were essentially built as a form of land reclamation
    That embankment was actually built to house a sewer, designed by Joseph Bazalgette. The land reclamation and the street above the sewer were a bonus.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In AE, we have embankments on roads far from waterways.
    We also have riverfronts and waterfronts without roads, e.g. the San Antonio (Texas) Riverwalk is a path fronting the San Antonio River.
    We would use neither of your suggestions as a generic term for roads along waterways.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I wonder what's the correct name for a street next to a river: an embankment or a waterfront/riverfront? E.g. let's walk along the ...
    It might be easier to say Let's walk along the river. Especially if there is no risk of being misunderstood as referring to the river beach...
     
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    Pesenka

    New Member
    Russian
    There are two rivers in my city and a number of rivefront streets with different names. The city signs refer to each as "... Embankment". I just feel it's not right...
     

    Pesenka

    New Member
    Russian
    The signs are in two languages - Russian and English, and the English version reads "Embankment". It's a street with houses and a car road.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't know what city Pesenka lives in. Wikipedia uses "embankment" to refer to all such structures in St Petersburg, and I don't see anything wrong with this: Neva embankments - Wikipedia

    I am very familiar with the idea that an "embankment" is a road in a city alongside a river and partly built into the river, beach or surrounding marsh; but that may be partly because I know London and St Petersburg. This may help: Embankment - Wikipedia

    Of course, there are plenty of alternatives, depending on the exact impression that the designer of the sign is intending to convey.
     
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