embossed and rubber seals

apoziopeza

Senior Member
slovak
Hi,

Please advise,


Is my understanding correct?

Thanks,

A.

Context:

All account balance certificated shall bear the class A and B signatures together with the Latin embossed and rubber seals; otherwise will be considered as null and void.

My understanding
All account balance certificated shall bear the class A and B signatures together with the rubber Latin embossed seals; otherwise will be considered as null and void.

I understand that there can be rubber or no rubber seals (which do not use color and are only embossed on paper). These seals are rubber. It means that the seals are both Latin embossed and rubber.

Thanks,
A.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Where is this from?

    Quite honestly, I cannot make any sense of it. The use of "and" and "seals" (plural) can only mean that the document needs at least two seals, one embossed and one rubber (it is not clear whether "Latin" applies to both or only to "embossed"), but I have no idea what a "rubber seal" is. Something can be sealed in ink using a rubber stamp, but I would not have called this a "rubber seal". An "embossed seal" is presumably in wax.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    An embossed seal is formed with an embossing press - it embosses the paper. It can be colourless or the raised embossing can be coloured. I have not the faintest idea what a rubber seal is.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    All account balance certificated shall bear the class A and B signatures together with the Latin embossed and rubber seals; otherwise will be considered as null and void.
    Some countries and jurisdictions require a plethora of evidence of certification in order to indicate that the document has passed through various stages of authentication. Both embossing and "rubber-stamping" can be part of the process.
    Andy, above, describes the embossed dry seal:
    emboss.jpg


    A rubber stamp seal would be something like this:
    seal stamp.jpg

    i.e. the design of a seal on a rubber stamp.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    Where is this from?

    Quite honestly, I cannot make any sense of it. The use of "and" and "seals" (plural) can only mean that the document needs at least two seals, one embossed and one rubber (it is not clear whether "Latin" applies to both or only to "embossed"), but I have no idea what a "rubber seal" is. Something can be sealed in ink using a rubber stamp, but I would not have called this a "rubber seal". An "embossed seal" is presumably in wax.
    It is an English version of an Iranian bank statement. I am translating it into Slovak. The document I received contains signatures and one stamp on each page, the first page is an introductory page stating the summary of the balance, debet and credit. It is signed and stamped. The remaining pages are detailed currrent account statements with all credits and debets, each of them is singed and stamped. There is always just one and the same stamp.
    So I suppose, it is just a bad wording of non-native speaker. Thanks.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    Some countries and jurisdictions require a plethora of evidence of certification in order to indicate that the document has passed through various stages of authentication. Both embossing and "rubber-stamping" can be part of the process.
    Andy, above describes the embossed dry seal
    View attachment 33815

    A rubber stamp seal would be something like this:
    View attachment 33816
    Thanks a lot, this is also my understanding of rubber stamp seal.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    Hi,

    Please advise,


    Is my understanding correct?

    Thanks,

    A.

    Context:

    All account balance certificated shall bear the class A and B signatures together with the Latin embossed and rubber seals; otherwise will be considered as null and void.

    My understanding
    All account balance certificated shall bear the class A and B signatures together with the rubber Latin embossed seals; otherwise will be considered as null and void.

    I understand that there can be rubber or no rubber seals (which do not use color and are only embossed on paper). These seals are rubber. It means that the seals are both Latin embossed and rubber.

    Thanks,
    A.
    I think
    Persian date means date according to Persian calendar
    Latin date means date according to Julian calendar
    Do you agree? Or is the common to say "Persian date" and "Latin date"?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think
    Persian date means date according to Persian calendar
    Latin date means date according to Julian calendar
    Do you agree? Or is the common to say "Persian date" and "Latin date"?
    As there is no mention of "date" in the original, this appears to be unlikely. I suspect "Latin" should be "Roman" and refers to the Roman alphabet, as opposed to the Arabic/Farsi.

    See also Latin date = date in Latin calendar?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think
    Persian date means date according to Persian calendar
    Latin date means date according to Julian calendar
    Do you agree? Or is the common to say "Persian date" and "Latin date"?
    There is rarely any need to refer to other calendars in Britain, so I don't know by what name the calendar we use is usually referred to by people who do need to make a distinction, but a web search suggests it is not "Latin". Latin calendar only appears to give links to historical documents written in the Latin language, or to the names of months and dates used in the Roman period.

    Be careful not to confuse the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the Gregorian calendar that we use today, although the Julian calendar does survive in a few uses.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    There is rarely any need to refer to other calendars in Britain, so I don't know by what name the calendar we use is usually referred to by people who do need to make a distinction, but a web search suggests it is not "Latin". Latin calendar only appears to give links to historical documents written in the Latin language, or to the names of months and dates used in the Roman period.

    Be careful not to confuse the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the Gregorian calendar that we use today, although the Julian calendar does survive in a few uses.
    Thanks, yes, I agree.
     
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