embrace the vast ocean

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether it is idiomatic to use this phrase in the sentence:

"We can embrace the vast ocean in the costal park."

Thoughts: Some people say the ocean is very a dangerous figure in English and I was wondering whether I could imagine it is very beautiful and I want to embrace it.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    We do use 'embrace' in a figurative way, but not usually quite like this. We also think the ocean is beautiful as well as dangerous.

    If you 'embrace' something it usually means to welcome or 'hold it' in your mind. We embrace new ideas/a lifestyle/change (if we are open to them and welcome them).

    You could 'embrace the view' of the vast ocean in the coastal park.

    Or the land in the coastal park could 'embrace' the ocean (meaning that it is a curved bay that makes a sort of semi-circle like arms around the ocean).

    But 'We can embrace the ocean' sounds a bit strange.
     

    tulee

    Member
    English- Australia
    I agree with Chez. Embracing is normally used figuratively, so unless you are embracing an actual person the object of embracing is normally abstract. The closest thing i can think of that is similar to your sentence is if you embrace a particular aspect of the ocean (so it fulfills the abstract criteria).
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    We do use 'embrace' in a figurative way, but not usually quite like this. We also think the ocean is beautiful as well as dangerous.

    If you 'embrace' something it usually means to welcome or 'hold it' in your mind. We embrace new ideas/a lifestyle/change (if we are open to them and welcome them).

    You could 'embrace the view' of the vast ocean in the coastal park.

    Or the land in the coastal park could 'embrace' the ocean (meaning that it is a curved bay that makes a sort of semi-circle like arms around the ocean).

    But 'We can embrace the ocean' sounds a bit strange.
    Thank you very much.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I agree with Chez. Embracing is normally used figuratively, so unless you are embracing an actual person the object of embracing is normally abstract. The closest thing i can think of that is similar to your sentence is if you embrace a particular aspect of the ocean (so it fulfills the abstract criteria).
    Would you please explain it a bit. I couldn't get it.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    To explain tulee's statement by way of example...

    You might write,

    "We can embrace the vast beauty of the ocean in the coastal park." That way you're embracing (figuratively) the abstract "beauty of the ocean" rather than the more concrete "ocean."
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    To explain tulee's statement by way of example...

    You might write,

    "We can embrace the vast beauty of the ocean in the coastal park." That way you're embracing (figuratively) the abstract "beauty of the ocean" rather than the more concrete "ocean."
    I see. Thank you very much.
     
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