embrasure

Masis

Senior Member
Bulgarian
The walls, embrasured on their outside faces, are 10.6m high, 5m thick at the bottom and 2m wide at the top.

Please help me to understand what it's mean embrasured?
 
  • Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    I think in this case an embrasure is the slit you get in the walls of old castles, through which archers would shoot arrows at anyone who tried to get in. Does that work in this context?
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    maybe it's work i hope. Thanks for help. Maybe it's wont to say that this walls have amrasures in their outer faces. But embrasure in this case is a verb. That hamper me.
     

    tullyNic

    Member
    Chinese
    I agree with Tegs , but are you sure it's 5m thick?
    Or there is another suggestion...?
    If the slit is 5m thick, that would be a gate i think..
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oo i don't know that unfortunately. This is about the Great Wall of China. There are such a little fortresses and towers there.
     

    tullyNic

    Member
    Chinese
    Then it must be a gate..
    I don't think there is a slit like that which is actually on(when you climbed up there) the wall.
    Great ~
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Why must it be a gate? There are all kinds of embrasures in walls and frankly, for a wall as massive and ancient as the Great Wall of China, two meters thick at the top does not seem excessive. (The windows in my house are cut into stone walls that are one meter thick.)

    Have you looked at any pictures of embrasures? You can find some here, both ancient and modern. Do they help at all?
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    The walls, embrasured on their outside faces, are 10.6m high, 5m thick at the bottom and 2m wide at the top.

    Please help me to understand what it's mean embrasured?
    First of all, this sentence would not be understood by most American speakers, and I would encourage you not to use the verb in red.

    An embrasure is "an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing through".

    So, the sentence would mean this: The walls, which have holes in them so that guns could be fired through them, are 10.6 . . . .

    The problem is a very long, unknown word is used here. Best Wishes.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    The walls, embrasured on their outside faces, are 10.6m high, 5m thick at the bottom and 2m wide at the top.

    Please help me to understand what it's mean embrasured?
    "The walls (which have slits cut into their outside faces) are 10.6m high, 5m thick at the bottom, and 2m wide at the top."

    Does that make the sentence structure clearer? Some walls have embrasures going all the way through. I assume that these very thick walls have a passageway in the middle. An archer in the passageway could shoot arrows out of the embrasures on the side of the wall that faces enemies.
     

    Masis

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Each looks like a fantastic Chinese temple. colonnaded with pillars and with curved roofs. There are also wide access ramps on their northern sides and a tower at each of the four corners of the inner fortress adn in the middle of both the north and south walls.The walls, embrasured on their outside faces, are 10.6m high, 5m thick at the bottom and 2m wide at the top. Outer walls of a lesser hight encircled it on every side but the east, and on the west the passage through this outer wall makes an extra protective gateway on that more vulnerable side.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In the right context, embrasured would be entirely acceptable.
    I suspect that the scope of "the right context" has been considerably widened by the extensive exposure of younger people to fantasy gaming :)

    The essential quality of an embrasure is that it is very narrow on the outside so that it is difficult for an attacking force to fire projectiles inwards through the slit. On the inside, however, it is wider so that the defenders have a wide field of view through the slit.

    Example

    Another example, modern
     

    tullyNic

    Member
    Chinese
    The place used to attack in the Great Wall is about half meter(or longer) in length and width(not exactly the same), the thickness is about 40 cm.~

    I think here it used this word as a jargon of building to represent a wall in slope(certain degree to the horizontal.)
    Does this make any sense?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    The place used to attack in the Great Wall is about half meter(or longer) in length and width(not exactly the same), the thickness is about 40 cm.~

    I think here it used this word as a jargon of building to represent a wall in slope(certain degree to the horizontal.)
    Does this make any sense?
    No, I don't think that makes sense. Sorry. :)

    Embrasure is a very specific word that means those long, narrow openings in a wall. They don't have to be used militarily, though that is the historical usage, but I don't think embrasure can ever refer to the entire wall.
     
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