Embroilment comedy

lzarzalejo73

Senior Member
Spanish
I was wondering if it's OK to describe or call a theatre play, a movie, etc., as an "embroilment comedy" Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It depends on what you think "embroilment" means, and that depends on what sort of a comedy it is. However, I doubt, whatever it is, it is going to be correct.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I was wondering if it's OK to describe or call a theatre play, a movie, etc., as an "embroilment comedy" Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
    Could the phrase 'embroilment comedy' be used? That is, can it be regarded in a suitable context as good English?
    Answer: yes, certainly.

    Should it be used? Is it sensible to say such a thing?
    Answer: not unless it is part of a reasoned classification of types of comedy.
    Even then, it may be better to avoid it.

    What is it meant to refer to? There may well be a better term to use.
    I wonder if you are referring to farce.

    If farce is what you have in mind, and if you are looking for a brief phrase by which to define it, then 'embroilment comedy' is a good term for it.
     
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    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you all for your kind answer. By "embroilment comedy" I intend to describe a very twisted plot, entangled, with lots of disorder and confusion, very conflicting characters and plot, but not quite a "farce". Anyway, following your advice I'll try to find another way to describe this type of comedy, although I doubt my knowledge of the English language will be of much help,unless I change it slightly for "a comedy with a very embroiled plot", which I'm not even confident it may work. Thank you very much.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Do you have any well-know movie in mind that we might be familiar with? It might give us a better idea of what you are after.:)
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sorry I did not reply earlier but I had to read up on the subject. From what I found, during the Spanish Golden Age, the “enredo” (embroilment, intrigue) was a very extended, popular comedy genre. “A Lady of Little Sense” by Lope de Vega is a classic example. At the time this genre was known as “comedia palatina” (palace comedy). Presently, in English, I’ve read it is comparable to the Comedy of Intrigue or Comedy of Situation, but I personally have my doubts they are the same thing (although who am I to?). The were not necessarily “funny” comedies, like Sitcoms or Comedy of Errors are (Popular entertainment composed of jokes, satire, or humorous performance). It seems a classic English comedy of that genre is the 1596 The Merchant of Venice, by Shakespeare, but I’m totally void of knowledge on the subject. More modern, present day examples are (it seems): A Fine Mess - by Blake Edward, 1986 American Comedy film. One, Two, Three – by Billy Wilder (1961) or Bringing Up Baby – by Howard Hawks (1938). I hope this helps. Thanks in advance for your kind assistance.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Bringing Up Baby, the only one you've cited that I'm familiar with (well, other than Merchant of Venice, which doesn't really seem to fit), is often referred to as a "screwball comedy." There's a Wikipedia article on the genre.
     
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