embrouilleur de grue

Kelib3

New Member
English
Hey!

I was wondering whether anyone could help me out with a translation of 'embrouiller de grue'.

Context: it's the headline of an article in 'Le Canard enchaîné'. The article is about Fathers for Justice protests, particulary concerning the situation of Serge Charnay.

I know that 'embrouiller' means to muddle/confuse, or disentangle in its literal sense, and that a 'grue' is a crane, but am not sure how these two would work together to form a headline that makes sense.

Any help would be very much appreciated! :D
 
  • Michelvar

    Quasimodo
    French / France
    Hi, and welcome!

    Embrouilleur = trouble maker, man doing something not clear (une embrouille)
    de grue : because this man climbed a crane to protest.

    This title is meaning less also in French, it's just to be taken literally, a man muddling on top of a crane.
     

    frenchifried

    Senior Member
    English - UK/US
    Welcome Kelib3
    Can you send the link to the article - I don't know why, but I can't access it. However, given the controversy surrounding this story, I would translate this as "Hoist with his own Petard", but I may be quite, quite wrong. I would like to see the context of the article first!

    My suggestion is not a literal translation but a suggestion of meaning
     
    Last edited:

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    Welcome Kelib3
    Can you send the link to the article - I don't know why, but I can't access it. However, given the controversy surrounding this story, I would translate this as "Hoist with his own Petard", but I may be quite, quite wrong. I would like to see the context of the article first!

    My suggestion is not a literal translation but a suggestion of meaning
    A nice try. But M Charnay does not seem particularly to have been "hoist": he has gained a good deal more attention than he seems to deserve, much of it apparently sympathetic.
     

    frenchifried

    Senior Member
    English - UK/US
    As I said, I was not going for a literal translation. And Charnay was rather 'hoist'. There was a certain amount of sympathy to begin with until other facts came to the fore. The story has rather lost its impetus on all the TV channels, which is why I would like to read the Canard Enchaîné article. I know I was sticking my neck out . . .:rolleyes:
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    Living on the wrong side of the pond, I admit to not getting it. :eek: Is bouilleur de cru a derogatory expression? Would appreciate an explanation.
    It is not derogatory. It is simply that headline writers like to echo (or twist) set expressions. This is quite a good attempt: "embrouilleur de grue" is an apt short description of the situation; it is quite close to the underlying phrase; and M Charnay has in a sense "boiled down" the "raw" frustrations of many men who share his attitude to parenthood and fatherhood (even if in less extreme form) and think that they are getting a hard time from the system.
     

    Kelib3

    New Member
    English
    Hi, thanks to you all for such quick responses.
    I dont think that the article is online, at least I couldnt find it. I have taken it out of the newspaper itself so unfortunately I dont have a copy to give!

    On the discussion of embrouilleur de grue the bouilleur de cru option seems to be quite apt. (also according to professors at my uni). Also it was said that this was something to do with distilling of wine illegally? Still a bit confused on how it fits into the actual article. Quite liked the idea of boiling down the raw fustration suggestions however surely that takes out the derogatory connotations of bouilleur de cru??

    Thanks for your speculations though because I think that speculate is all we can do when it comes to this headline!
     

    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    On the discussion of embrouilleur de grue the bouilleur de cru option seems to be quite apt. (also according to professors at my uni). Also it was said that this was something to do with distilling of wine illegally? Still a bit confused on how it fits into the actual article.
    I think it actually doesn't; it is but a gratuitous wordplay, and that's why Itisi and Michelvar went :thumbsdown:. I share the sentiment. :)
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    Only because it's the type of wordplay that makes you groan. Some jokes are better than others, aren't they?
    In a context like this, eliciting the groan is exactly what makes it a joke. If that were not so, a lot of sub-editors would be out of a job.
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    (Attempts at translation appear to have been lost in yesterday's kerfuffle so I'll revive my pearls of wisdom measly contribution).

    Embrouilleur = trouble maker, man doing something not clear (une embrouille)
    Here it's only the former, the man's actions were clear.

    A somewhat vulgar, and free, translation could be "Dropping shit from on high". (Real cranes, Grus grus, also do that but it isn't obvious how to incorporate it, the idea I mean!).

    (The suggestion probably should have been left in the black hole into which it disappeared).
     
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