emotion/feeling/passion

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1. Lei Feng's spirits has aroused the ______ of my classmates.
2. I understand your ____ about him but I will not do that sort of thing.

The answer to the blanks are emotions and emotion respectively


Can I use passion in sentence1 and feelings in sentence2

It's really tough to tell them apart.

I'd appreciate it very much if you would help me with it.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Interestingly -- and I mean nothing by it except familiarity with a way of phrasing -- when I read those sentences and the choices (and I read fast enough to miss "Lei Feng"), I immediately thought "China."

    For me, "feelings" in sentence 2 is the only usage that's not awkward to the native-English ear. But of the choices, I guess "passion" and "feelings" are better than "emotions" and "emotion" by far.

    And in #1, we really need to know what's going on. "Lei Feng's spirits" is not right for us. Is it his spirit? And if it is, we need to know what kind of spirit, e.g. "fighting spirit" or "patriotic fervor" or whatever.

    I can't really offer more than that at the moment, but I've worked with back-translations from the Chinese language for many years and I always come across these phrases that are very difficult to tease the meaning from and to rephrase so that both sides are happy. It usually requires a lot of discussion.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    Firstly sentence one should read either '...spirit has...' or '..spirits have...' so that the tenses agree (3rd person sinle or plural).

    You are correct in the use of the two words. While passion and feelings are both emotions, passion is much more intense, an overflowing of feelings. The second speaker is moderating, a person who is less inclined to to be caught up or ruled by emotion.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Keep in mind that "aroused the emotions/feelings/passions" of the classmates doesn't really tell the reader whether these were positive or negative, whether the students were with him or against him.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    I agree with Copyright that the first sentense does not indicate that the students' passions were positive or negative, however the implication of the response is that they were mostly positive, in agreement with Leifeng.

    Also note that we say 'selfless' or 'unselfish' as the oposite of 'selfish'.
     
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