Emotionally Demanding Customer

gkstnduwk95

New Member
Korean
Hi everyone, I'm trying to find the best way to translate '1. emotionally demanding customers' and '2. emotionally intelligent customer response(or service)'.

As obvious as it is, the context would be in the case of providing customer service of electronics(phone service or actual repair service). It defines customers that are either verbally abusive during service or demand free service/complain about a defect that's not really a defect (like saying 'my refrigerator is too noisy' when the noise it produces is in an acceptable range of decibel defined by the manufacturer)

The latter means to provide customer service in a manner that sympathizes and deals with these customers' feelings. So... 'intelligent' would mean something like 'sensitive to customer's emotion'.

I'm shooting for something containing the following words in an order that makes more sense 'clientes exigentes emocionalmente'. But does that even have the same ring to it? As for the second phrase I'm drawing a blank.

Thanks!
 
  • Tiramisu ★

    Member
    Spanish - Latin America
    It sounds good! Although I would place the adverb after the subject: "Clientes emocionalmente exigentes/demandantes."
    As for the second phrase, it means that the employee who's in charge of customer service must deal with the situation in a smart way as to keep their emotions in check and avoid getting weighed down by the customer's negative mood. "Servicio al cliente emocionalmente inteligente".
     

    gkstnduwk95

    New Member
    Korean
    It sounds good! Although I would place the adverb after the subject: "Clientes emocionalmente exigentes/demandantes."
    As for the second phrase, it means that the employee who's in charge of customer service must deal with the situation in a smart way as to keep their emotions in check and avoid getting weighed down by the customer's negative mood. "Servicio al cliente emocionalmente inteligente".
    Good, thanks. I'm a Korean native speaker that learned English in the States so I usually have a good grasp of adjective orders in English but Spanish is a little trickier. (English also has a syntax rule for adjective orders which does make it easier). I didn't think 'intelligent' in such context would have had the same meaning in Spanish as well. Good to know.
     

    Tiramisu ★

    Member
    Spanish - Latin America
    Yes! Adverb placement in Spanish tends to be a bit tricky. Some adverbs of manner can go both after or before the adjective they act upon. There's a slight difference in rhythm in my opinion. But, for example, if the original sentence was something like really demanding customers, it would't be correct to say clientes demandantes realmente, but clientes realmente demandantes. It varies from case to case though!

    As for the second sentence, it really is pretty literal, yes! Sometimes, specially in terminology, there isn't much place for creativity and the translation ends up being literal. The only problem I see is that anyone that's not familiar with marketing and the term "Servicio al cliente emocionalmente inteligente" might think that "emocionalmente inteligente" would describe "cliente", when the subject of that sentence is "servicio al cliente". However, when these terms are used in the context they belong to, like marketing, they work just fine. Good luck!
     

    Rodal

    Banned
    Castellano (Chile)
    Qué te parece: atención para clientes que demandan atención emocional y luego para la segunda frase: atención al cliente con un manejo inteligente de las emociones.
     
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