EMP [= Europe Main Port?]

marsbeing

Senior Member
Hello everybody. I need your help with the acronym EMP.

I thought it should be quite easy to find its full name using Google. Unfortunately I have done this but no luck.

EMP is a term in international trade, and according to my book, standing for Europe Main Port. But I have doubts about what the book says because a noun is rarely used before an adjective to modify another noun. Is the term actually the abbreviation of 'European Main Port'?

Speaking of this, I have one more question. I have seen both 'Chinese port' and 'China port' somewhere. Are both correct? And if so, what are the differences?

Thank you very much for taking the time to help.

Ken
 
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  • pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    As far as I know, EMP is the hot topic of the last decade or so. It refers to Electro-Magnetic Pulse, either natural (solar flares) or made-made (a weapon to wipe out anything solid state electronic and power grids).
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Hello everybody. I need your help with the acronym EMP.

    I thought it should be quite easy to find its full name using Google. Unfortunately I have done this but no luck.

    EMP is a term in international trade, and according to my book, standing for Europe Main Port. But I have doubts about what the book says because a noun is rarely used before an adjective to modify another noun. Is the term actually the abbreviation of 'European Main Port'?

    Speaking of this, I have one more question. I have seen both 'Chinese port' and 'China port' somewhere. Are both correct? And if so, what are the differences?

    Thank you very much for taking the time to help.

    Ken
    Ken, we need to see the abbreviation used in a sentence. Please also tell us the title of the book you're getting the sentence from. It's impossible to be even slightly definitive about such things without some context. And actually, all sorts of things to be used as modifiers in all sorts of places.
     

    marsbeing

    Senior Member
    Thanks for your reply, JustKate. Unfortunately the book is in Chinese.

    The sentence in question is: <<Chinese transcription deleted. Sorry!>>

    My attempt at the translation: In practice, though, the name of the destination port can be unspecified, for example CIF EMP. EMP is a term in international trade which refers to several famous big ports in Europe, such as Rotterdam and Hamburg.

    @Pops:

    Thank you very much for the link. It's very useful! :)
     
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    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    It is odd that it's Europe Main Port instead of European Main Port. Europe Main Port is only possible, at least for me, if it's written something like this: Europe, Main Port. That is, if you have some ports classified other ways - e.g., Europe, Minor Port or Asia, Transitional Port (I'm just making those up since I don't know much about ports) - but you also have some classified as Europe, Main Port.

    By the way, I'm going to have to delete the Chinese in your previous post because we don't allow that. But you're always welcome to post a translation.
     
    Mars, I don't understand your question. The article apparently says what EMP stands for.


    ADDED: Further the phrase is used, as Google for Europe Main Port shows:


    http://www.globalsources.com/gsol/I/Freight-service/p/sm/1062251286.htm#1062251286
    Sea Freight Services Wholesaler

    Sea Freight Services from Taiwan to Europe Main Port

    Pop's guess, based on this later post, seems wrong.

    ADDED: The English version sounds a bit Chinese, but if that's the usual rendering of the Chinese, why not use it?
     
    Hi pops,

    What you said is quoted below. One would assume it was meant to apply to the issue of the OP. I guess from your later post #12 it was not so meant.
    I'm glad you clarified. The whole questions seems like a bit of a snipe hunt if the passage itself explains the acronym.

    As far as I know, EMP is the hot topic of the last decade or so. It refers to Electro-Magnetic Pulse, either natural (solar flares) or made-made (a weapon to wipe out anything solid state electronic and power grids).
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    Hi pops,

    What you said is quoted below. One would assume it was meant to apply to the issue of the OP. I guess from your later post #12 it was not so meant.
    I'm glad you clarified. The whole questions seems like a bit of a snipe hunt if the passage itself explains the acronym.
    Agreed! I think it is not as common in our world as it may be in others. Say EMP here and we are talking possible disaster.
     

    marsbeing

    Senior Member
    The English version sounds a bit Chinese, but if that's the usual rendering of the Chinese, why not use it?
    Ironically, the Chinese is the translation of EMP which is the standard term used in documents of international trade. "Europe main port" might be the result of the author's unproficient English of which he is not a native speaker.

    Also, this is essentially a language learning question as I am pedantic about words. :D
     
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    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    In fact, I am pedantic about words and this is essentially a language learning question (European main port or Europe main port).

    Ironically, the Chinese is the translation of EMP which is the standard term used in documents of international trade. Now it seems "Europe main port" might be the result of the unproficiency of the author, who is not a native speaker of English.
    Undoubtedly. He left off the 'an'.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Ironically, the Chinese is the translation of EMP which is the standard term used in documents of international trade. "Europe main port" might be the result of the author's unproficient English of which he is not a native speaker.

    Also, this is essentially a language learning question as I am pedantic about words. :D
    EMP should be read in full as being shorthand for "Europe [pause] Main Port." This is a bullet point for "To Europe, to a main port."

    Container shipping rates and services are very much dependent upon the port to which the container is shipped. Main ports will have highly efficient container handling systems and will have many regular services to them. Thus to ship goods in a container to Rotterdam will cost the shipping agent far less than to ship to a small port a few kilometres up the coast. To ship goods in a container to Hamburg, Rotterdam, Bremen, Gdansk, Helsinki, etc is about the same price.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As a side note, international abbreviations are often not in the order that might be expected in English. For example, UTC is Universal Coordinated Time in English and, if you were using proper French, the abbreviation would be TUC.
     

    marsbeing

    Senior Member
    Thanks Paul. Your explanation makes good sense. I guess you must have some experience in international trade. At least, you seem to know the port thing very well.

    And thank you Myridon for your side note.

    And Pops, I thank you again for your input.


    Ken
     
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