Emphatic word for adverbs of time

Vronsky

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Hi,
If I want to emphasize adverbs of time, for example in the dialog

"Have you done it already?"
"Yes, I have. I did it yesterday."​

I want to emphasize the time when I did it - 'yesterday'. What emphatic word could I use before 'yesterday' (or maybe after it)?
Is already nice? - "I did it yesterday already."

Thank you.
 
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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's no emphatic word to add before or after yesterday.
    "Yes, I have. I {expression} did it yesterday!"

    {expression} can range from polite to extremely rude, but I don't think anybody has said "I jolly well did it yesterday" in the last 75 years. (You might find that in the mouth of Bertie Wooster in one of PG Wodehouse's "Jeeves" books.)
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    You could stress that you did the thing: "Yes, I DID do it yesterday," but there are no adverb-specific modifiers I can think of in this context.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Do you want to emphasize that the period of time was long or short? If it's the latter, you can say, "I did it just yesterday."
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Thank you very much, everyone.

    Do you want to emphasize that the period of time was long or short? If it's the latter, you can say, "I did it just yesterday."
    Actually, I want to emphasize that the work was done before expected time.
    I know that I can use 'already' for this purpose in the present perfect: "I have done it already."
    I wonder if I can use 'already' in the simple past: "I did it yesterday already."
     
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    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I wonder if I can use 'already' in the simple past: "I did it yesterday already."
    You can say, "I did it already," but "I did it yesterday already" doesn't sound right.

    In natural speech, you would switch the words, and insert a pause:
    "Hey, I need you to do that."
    "I did it already, yesterday."
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    "I did it already, yesterday."
    I think I see your point. Your sentence combines 2 ideas: "I have done it already" + "I did it yesterday." Here, 'already' emphasizes that the work has been done, not that I did it yesterday. :)
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Do you want to emphasize that the period of time was long or short? If it's the latter, you can say, "I did it just yesterday."
    What if I want to emphasize that the period of time was long? For example,

    A: "Did you buy a new car?" (looking at B's new car in surprise)
    B: "I bought it last year."

    Is there a way to emphasize 'last year'?
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    What if I want to emphasize that the period of time was long? For example,

    A: "Did you buy a new car?" (surprisingly looking at B's new car)
    B: "I bought it last year."

    Is there a way to emphasize 'last year'?
    You could say perhaps, "I bought it a whole year ago."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "I did it already, yesterday."

    You could boost it further if you wanted to emphasize yesterday (for example if the project was due today).

    "I did it already. Yesterday, as a matter of fact." (I'm not sure of the punctuation here but I'm perceiving this as being spoken not written.)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Does 'a whole year' means 365 days?
    Not precisely, but somewhere in that range. It could be 10 months or 13 but it's some pretty good chunk of a year.

    The trouble is, that B (below) is a bit ambiguous.
    A: "Did you buy a new car?" (looking at B's new car in surprise)
    B: "I bought it last year."
    Did the person say "I bought it last year" in January or did they say that in November?

    If it was January, then "last year" could mean it was bought in December and is a month old. Or it could mean it was bought the previous February and is 11 months old.

    If it was November, then it's pretty clear the car is, at the newest, almost a year old and possibly even almost two years old.

    So saying "a whole year ago" makes the most sense when the situation is being discussed in January, because that tells the person that the car is almost a year old when saying "last year" does not tell them that.
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    More or less. "A whole year" is just a way of emphasizing the length of the year. For example, John and Mary move to France on April 5th. The following year on or near April 5th, John says to Mary, "Wow, can you believe it's been a whole year since we moved to France?" And Mary might say, "No, I can't. Wow, time flies!"

    For your example, "I bought it last year already," I would suggest the same as if you replace "last year" with "yesterday."

    "Mark, when are you going to buy a car?"
    "I bought one already, last year."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    And in this example 'already' doesn't work also? "I bought it last year already."
    No, already doesn't make much sense if the question is "Did you buy a new car?" You could say something like, I bought this one at the beginning of last year.
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    "I did it already. Yesterday, as a matter of fact." (I'm not sure of the punctuation here but I'm perceiving this as being spoken not written.)
    Yes, but this simply means: actually, in fact, virtually, de facto, practically. This doesn't emphasize that the work was done before expected time.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Conversationally you could add emphasis by repetition.

    "Have you done it already?"

    "Yes, yesterday. I got it done yesterday."


    Note: This is not formal English. Repetition and changing word order are common in dialog.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Indeed I did it yesterday.
    I did it yesterday in fact.
    I did it yesterday, actually.
    I did it even yesterday.
    [English of a few centuries ago]
    I did it yesterday, even. [dialect]
     

    Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    I did it even yesterday. [English of a few centuries ago]
    I did it yesterday, even. [dialect]
    Yes, that is how we would say it in Russian (if Google Translator serves correctly :) )
    But why don't you use these phrases now?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Yes, that is how we would say it in Russian (if Google Translator serves correctly :) )
    But why don't you use these phrases now?
    I don't know. We still use even, but not quite as flexibly, and even tends to imply something like "also" along with being emphatic.

    Another version (suggested by Google Translate): I did it yesterday, yet.

    That sounds a little strange to me, and suggests that yesterday might be a very unlikely time for me to have done it.
     
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