employ / engage

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Xander2024

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

Will someone please help me build the following sentence correctly:

"Do you mind his being employed(?)/engaged(?) to work at our office?"
Are both verbs interchangable?

I wonder if "to work" can be left out since the verbs "to employ" and "to engage" imply that he will work, not just sit around. But what will the sentence look like then? Or maybe there are far better ways to say it?

Thanks a lot.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Do you mind him being employed in our office?
    Do you mind him working in our office?

    Note: His, rather than him, may be correct in those sentences, but I can't ever hear myself using them. I am a peasant. :) So I definitely wouldn't use engaged.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Even though I now live in the big city, I still never hear engage. I know that it can be used -- We engaged a pool boy for the summer -- but no one ever does. We just hire them or employ them.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Does "hire" always mean "temporary employment" as my text books say?
    No, not at all. Hire means to employ someone -- for an hour or for the next 30 years. I would expect to see something like "She was a temporary hire just until the Christmas rush was over" if temporary employment was meant. There may be other examples, but hire is neutral on the subject of longevity of employment.
     
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