EN: J'aime venir à Paris

  • Plant Mom

    New Member
    English - United States
    Neither is correct. It would be "I like going to Paris" or "I like to go to Paris." There are several other phrases that would be correct here too, here are some of them: "I like visiting Paris." "I like to visit Paris." "I enjoy going to Paris." etc.

    "Coming in" is a very specific phrase in English, for example, you would come in the door or come in the house. You could even come into the city, but that's used mainly when you are talking about the specific time period of your arrival in the city.

    Prepositions in English are hard and weirdly specific, like for example, you get on a plane but you get in a car, even though you are boarding a vehicle in each example.
     

    phenithere

    New Member
    francais
    Thank you all for your help.
    My question is on the use of verbs with -ing just after a first verb.
    I read an English grammar rule that explains that after a first verbs like enjoy, mind or suggest we use verbs with -ing ( and not to +verb)
    But I'm not sure to use this grammatical form correctly.
    exemple : I enjoy Reading ( and not I enjoy to read)
    Or : Suddenly everybody stopped talking. ( not stopped to talk)
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    1 - I enjoy coming in paris
    2 - I like to come in paris
    Le problème est surtout le verbe to come qui est inapproprié ; on utilise to go dans ce genre de cas comme suggéré par Plant Mom.

    Or : Suddenly everybody stopped talking. ( not stopped to talk)
    À noter la différence de sens :

    Everybody stopped talking = Tout le monde s'est arrêté de parler.
    Everybody stopped to talk = Tout le monde s'est arrêté pour parler.

    Voir aussi :
     

    Plant Mom

    New Member
    English - United States
    My question is on the use of verbs with -ing just after a first verb.
    I read an English grammar rule that explains that after a first verbs like enjoy, mind or suggest we use verbs with -ing ( and not to +verb)
    But I'm not sure to use this grammatical form correctly.
    exemple : I enjoy Reading ( and not I enjoy to read)
    Or : Suddenly everybody stopped talking. ( not stopped to talk)
    When you have two verbs, one right after the other, you can use "ing" to make the second verb, in essence, a noun (not really but its function in the sentence is very similar to a noun). You can technically say I love to read, but I love reading is way more common.

    In the original question, you would say "I like going to Paris." That would be a correct sentence. "I like to go to Paris" is also correct, but like in the previous example, "going" is way more common than "to go."

    In the example "everybody stopped talking," if you say "everybody stopped to talk," the "to" in the second sentence here serves the purpose of the words "in order to." Another wording of the sentence "everybody stopped to talk" would be "everybody stopped what they were doing in order to talk." Both mean the same thing.

    Sorry if this isn't too helpful, I don't know French and that might be limiting my ability to explain the rules of English.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    From the thread title, I see that the OP is trying to translate j'aime venir à Paris (and not j'aime aller à Paris).
    Let's say that X lives in Strasbourg. X likes to go to Paris. One day X goes to Paris to see a friend who lives there.
    X says to the friend, "j'aime venir à Paris."
    X uses the verb "venir" (to come) because X is in Paris.

    In American English, I would say either I like coming to Paris or I like to come to Paris.
    If I used the verb "to enjoy," I would only say I enjoy coming to Paris.
    I enjoy to come to Paris:cross:
    is not correct.

    :warning:Attention ! C'est "coming/come to Paris"
    "I enjoy coming in Paris/I like to come in Paris" ===> J'aime jouir à Paris.:eek:
     
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