en masse [pronunciation]

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
My dictionary says that "en masse" read as /ɔŋ'mɑ:s/, and WRF /ɑ̃ mas/, and Cambridge Dictionary UK /ˌɒ̃ ˈmæs/ US /ˌɑ̃ː ˈmæs/.

Which pronunciation would you prefer?

Thanks in advance


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New York (CNN)In Donald Trump's America, undocumented immigrants will be deported en masse, Arab Americans will be racially profiled and the United States will "bomb the s--- out of ISIS."

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  • NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    No, the /ŋ/ is obviously wrong. Would you care to tell us the name of your dictionary?
    The two dictionaries are embedded in an app. I got a screenshot as below


    It says there are two sources: 以上来源于: WordNet (it means "the above comes from WordNet) and 21世纪大英汉词典 (it means "21 Century Great English-Chinese Dictionary").

    What is weird is that when I clicked WordNet, I found it leads to PRINCETON UNIVERSITY: About WordNet - WordNet - About WordNet
    Yet I failed to find the entry "en masse" there.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    And the OED writes it as /ɒn ˈmas/. As far as BE is concerned, I'd say it is pronounced the same as "on mass", as the OED suggests. Few BE speakers attempt to use an accurate French pronunciation.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I pronounce it like Andy.

    But I see our WR dictionaries give different options.

    en masse - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    Random House: (än mas, en; Fr. äN mas)
    Collins: /French: ɑ̃ mas/

    They seem to give French style pronunciations (Random House äN mas′ = IPA /ɑ̃ mas/. The Random House first respelt version means /ɑːnmæs/, which I take to be an American version of my /ɒn ˈmas/.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Some English expressions have a French nasalized vowel, but if this is changed to use a consonant, it's always [n], I think, never [ŋ].
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It's [n] certainly in ensuite, en bloc, envelope or en passant in Anglicised pronunciations. But there is often [ŋ] in encore but that's to do with assimilation towards /k/.

    I wonder whether this has to do with what people sometimes tell English speakers to do in order produce a nasalised vowel: present you are going to say the vowel + [ŋ] - only don't actually say the [ŋ]!
     
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